A man convicted of possession of crack cocaine who was serving a double life sentence in prison before his release under the First Step Act thanked President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE and White House adviser Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Senate receives impeachment articles as trial opens Kushner: When you work for Trump 'you don't make the waves, he makes the waves' Trump scheduled to attend Davos amid impeachment trial MORE in a video Friday.

In a video posted by Trump supporter Kareem Lanier, Anthony Swatzie thanked Trump and Kushner, telling viewers that he saw "no way out" before the First Step Act, which allows those serving extended sentences for nonviolent offenses to petition for early release, became law last year.

"I didn't see no way out," Swatzie says in the video, which has been viewed tens of thousands of times. "But I kept fighting, and kept fighting, and kept fighting, man."

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"I just want to thank Kushner, man, for pushing the bill," he continues. "And President Trump for signing it."

The video was later retweeted by Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump scheduled to attend Davos amid impeachment trial Lawmakers introduce bill to bolster artificial intelligence, quantum computing Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers say Facebook deepfake ban falls short | House passes bills to win 5G race | Feds sound alarm on cyberthreat from Iran | Ivanka Trump appearance at tech show sparks backlash MORE, who is married to Kushner and also works as an assistant to the president at the White House.

The First Step Act allows some inmates like Swatzie to build up "earned time credits" for service in vocational and other educational programs, which serve as credits toward their total sentence and can lead to early release.

Court documents reveal that Swatzie petitioned a court as recently as 2013 and as far back as 2000 for his sentence to be reduced, only to be denied both times.