Williamson campaign pushes back on 'Oprah's BFF' title
© Aaron Schwartz

White House hopeful Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson discusses speaking at People's Party Convention Fewer people watched opening night of Democratic convention compared to 2016 Marianne Williamson: Democratic convention 'like binge watching a Marriott commercial' MORE doesn’t want you to call her a “guru” or “Oprah’s BFF.”

Headlines have referred to Williamson as everything from a “self-help guru” to a “wellness guru” to “Oprah’s spiritual adviser” and “friend of Oprah’s."

But in a Tuesday press release, Patricia Ewing, Williamson’s communications director, emailed a list of “standardized facts” about the author ahead of Wednesday night’s debate among 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, clarifying Williamson's job title.

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Along with Williamson’s name, age, birthplace and occupation — “best-selling author and activist” — Ewing wrote, “Not her occupation: Spiritual guru (or any type of guru). Any title that is conferred to a different religious tradition than her own."  

“Also not her occupation: Oprah’s BFF or Oprah’s guru. (Or, any title that rightfully belongs to Gayle KingGayle KingGayle King calls out Pelosi for calling Trump supporters 'henchmen': 'Egregious language' Fauci: Lack of masks at Trump rallies frustrating The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump, GOP senators at odds over next stimulus bill MORE.)” 

Williamson was a spiritual counselor to Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyNYT security guard who went viral for interaction with Biden will have prominent role at convention: report Louisville Breonna Taylor billboard erected by Oprah Magazine vandalized with red paint 'White privilege' is the biggest white lie of all MORE, appearing regularly on her show, according to Vox. She is also the author of 13 books, four of which are No. 1 New York Times best-sellers.

The 2020 candidate also co-founded Project Angel Food, which delivers meals to “ill and dying homebound patients.” She also co-founded The Peace Alliance, which takes “the work of peacebuilding from the margins of society into the center of national discourse and policy priorities,” according to its website.

The Hill has reached out to the Williamson campaign.