Williamson campaign pushes back on 'Oprah's BFF' title
© Aaron Schwartz

White House hopeful Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson on impeachment: Trump's actions 'too perilous' not to continue inquiry Marianne Williamson: DNC is 'dictating' rather than 'facilitating the process of democracy' Marianne Williamson explains how she, Tulsi, and Yang have been marginalized MORE doesn’t want you to call her a “guru” or “Oprah’s BFF.”

Headlines have referred to Williamson as everything from a “self-help guru” to a “wellness guru” to “Oprah’s spiritual adviser” and “friend of Oprah’s."

But in a Tuesday press release, Patricia Ewing, Williamson’s communications director, emailed a list of “standardized facts” about the author ahead of Wednesday night’s debate among 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, clarifying Williamson's job title.

ADVERTISEMENT

Along with Williamson’s name, age, birthplace and occupation — “best-selling author and activist” — Ewing wrote, “Not her occupation: Spiritual guru (or any type of guru). Any title that is conferred to a different religious tradition than her own."  

“Also not her occupation: Oprah’s BFF or Oprah’s guru. (Or, any title that rightfully belongs to Gayle KingGayle KingPortraits of Lin-Manuel Miranda, Jeff Bezos headed for National Portrait Gallery Weinstein's attorney says his 'whole life has been ruined': 'He never gets to be Harvey Weinstein ever again' Virginia Lt. Gov. Fairfax files 0 million defamation suit against CBS MORE.)” 

Williamson was a spiritual counselor to Oprah WinfreyOprah Gail WinfreyFamous gingers Prince Harry, Ed Sheeran team up for World Mental Health Day Oprah donates M to Morehouse College Michelle Obama to release companion book to 'Becoming' MORE, appearing regularly on her show, according to Vox. She is also the author of 13 books, four of which are No. 1 New York Times best-sellers.

The 2020 candidate also co-founded Project Angel Food, which delivers meals to “ill and dying homebound patients.” She also co-founded The Peace Alliance, which takes “the work of peacebuilding from the margins of society into the center of national discourse and policy priorities,” according to its website.

The Hill has reached out to the Williamson campaign.