Author and activist Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to stretch lead in Tuesday contests Pelosi: 'I usually always cast my vote for a woman' Pelosi: 'We'll have a woman president' someday MORE (D) was the most-searched candidate during the second night of the first 2020 Democratic debates Thursday night, according to Google Trends.  

Ahead of the second debate between the slate of Democratic White House hopefuls, candidates like Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDrugmaker caps insulin costs at to help diabetes patients during pandemic The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic Sen. Brown endorses Biden for president MORE (I-Vt.) and Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Schiff presses intel chief on staff changes | Warren offers plan to secure elections | Twitter's Jack Dorsey to donate B to coronavirus fight | WhatsApp takes steps to counter virus misinformation WhatsApp limiting message forwarding in effort to stop coronavirus misinformation The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Dybul interview; Boris Johnson update MORE (D-Calif.), former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump shakes up WH communications team The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic The Intercept's Ryan Grim says Cuomo is winning over critics MORE and entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangJack Dorsey committing billion to coronavirus relief efforts Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis Andrew Yang: Calling coronavirus 'China virus' only used to incite 'hostility' MORE garnered the most attention online.  

But, Williamson’s search interest surged nearly every time she spoke onstage, according to Google. Her answers called for inspiring Americans and leading with “love.”

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“I’ll tell you one thing, it’s really nice if we’ve got all these plans, but if you think we’re going to beat Donald Trump by just having all these plans, you’ve got another thing coming,” Williamson told her fellow candidates. “Because he didn’t win by saying he had a plan. He won by simply saying 'Make America Great Again.' We’ve got to get deeper than just these superficial fixes, as important as they are.”

“[President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE is] going to be beaten by somebody who has an idea what this man has done. ... You have harnessed fear for political purposes and only love can cast that out,” Williamson said later. “So I, sir, I have a feeling you know what you're doing. I'm going to harness love for political purposes. I will meet you on that field. And, sir, love will win.”

Williamson had the third-least speaking time during Thursday night’s debate, finishing ahead of only Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellKey House chairman cautions against remote voting, suggests other options amid coronavirus outbreak House Democrats plead with key committee chairman to allow remote voting amid coronavirus pandemic Congress tiptoes toward remote voting MORE (D-Calif) and Yang.

Williamson also hit candidates like Swalwell who during the debate argued that older candidates like Biden should “pass the torch” to the younger people running.

“The fact that somebody has a younger body doesn’t mean you don’t have old ideas,” Williamson said.

Harris and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg launches new PAC to aid down-ballot candidates HuffPost political reporter on why Bernie fell way behind Biden Economists fear slow pace of testing will prolong recession MORE (D) saw the second and third highest search rates during the debate, respectively, ahead of Biden and Yang.