Author and activist Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson discusses America's "soulless ethos" Marianne Williamson discusses speaking at People's Party Convention Fewer people watched opening night of Democratic convention compared to 2016 MORE (D) was the most-searched candidate during the second night of the first 2020 Democratic debates Thursday night, according to Google Trends.  

Ahead of the second debate between the slate of Democratic White House hopefuls, candidates like Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBudowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated Sanders's inauguration look promptly gets a bobblehead Booker brings girlfriend, actress Rosario Dawson, to inauguration MORE (I-Vt.) and Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisKaty Perry and her 'Firework' close out inauguration TV special Biden's first foreign leader call to be with Canada's Trudeau on Friday Harris now 'the most influential woman' in American politics MORE (D-Calif.), former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenKaty Perry and her 'Firework' close out inauguration TV special Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Tom Hanks: After years of 'troubling rancor,' Inauguration Day 'is about witnessing the permanence of our American ideal' MORE and entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangYang to quarantine after campaign staffer tests positive for COVID-19 Andrew Yang sparks Twitter uproar with pro-bodega video Yang announces run for New York City mayor MORE garnered the most attention online.  

But, Williamson’s search interest surged nearly every time she spoke onstage, according to Google. Her answers called for inspiring Americans and leading with “love.”

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“I’ll tell you one thing, it’s really nice if we’ve got all these plans, but if you think we’re going to beat Donald Trump by just having all these plans, you’ve got another thing coming,” Williamson told her fellow candidates. “Because he didn’t win by saying he had a plan. He won by simply saying 'Make America Great Again.' We’ve got to get deeper than just these superficial fixes, as important as they are.”

“[President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE is] going to be beaten by somebody who has an idea what this man has done. ... You have harnessed fear for political purposes and only love can cast that out,” Williamson said later. “So I, sir, I have a feeling you know what you're doing. I'm going to harness love for political purposes. I will meet you on that field. And, sir, love will win.”

Williamson had the third-least speaking time during Thursday night’s debate, finishing ahead of only Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellSwalwell compares Trump to bin Laden: They 'inspired and radicalized' Pelosi names 9 impeachment managers House Judiciary Democrats ask Pence to invoke 25th Amendment to remove Trump MORE (D-Calif) and Yang.

Williamson also hit candidates like Swalwell who during the debate argued that older candidates like Biden should “pass the torch” to the younger people running.

“The fact that somebody has a younger body doesn’t mean you don’t have old ideas,” Williamson said.

Harris and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Inauguration Day Biden faces tall order in uniting polarized nation OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate majority offers Biden new avenues on Trump environmental rollbacks | Democrats eye action on range of climate bills | Biden pushing to cancel Keystone XL pipeline as soon as he takes office: reports MORE (D) saw the second and third highest search rates during the debate, respectively, ahead of Biden and Yang.