Chants of "equal pay" reverberated from the bleachers of the Stade de Lyon in France on Sunday following the U.S. women's national team's 2-0 victory over Netherlands to win the FIFA Women's World Cup. 

Videos posted on social media showed different sections of fans repeatedly and loudly chanting "equal pay," a reference to the disparity between the income of the U.S. women's and men's national teams. 

The pay gap between men and women gained increased scrutiny as the U.S. women marched to their second consecutive World Cup title and record-breaking fourth championship overall. 

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The women's team is engaged in a gender discrimination lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation because the organization pays male players far more than female players. 

For example, each player on the U.S. women's national team could receive about $260,000 in maximum earnings for winning the Women's World Cup, according to documents obtained by The Guardian, while each player on the U.S. men's national team could have earned nearly $1 million if the club had won the World Cup. 

Democratic lawmakers, including multiple 2020 presidential candidates, have spoken out about the issue in recent months. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHarris weighing Biden endorsement: report California Democrat Christy Smith launches first TV ad in bid for Katie Hill's former House seat Steyer spokesperson: 'I don't think necessarily that Tom has bought anything' MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHarris weighing Biden endorsement: report Biden, Sanders contend for top place in new national poll Biden leads Democratic primary field nationally: poll MORE (D-Mass.) and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 MORE (D-N.Y.) in March signed on to a letter spearheaded by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) urging the United States Soccer Federation president to "ensure that the U.S. Women's National Team is fairly compensated."

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBiden to go on Iowa tour with swing district lawmakers CNN cancels next week's Iowa town halls Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez hit back at JPMorgan CEO over comments on socialism: 'That's funny' MORE (D-N.Y.) chimed in on the controversy on Sunday, tweeting, "At this point we shouldn’t even be asking for #EqualPay for the #USWMNT - we should demand they be paid at least twice as much."