Ocasio-Cortez about as well known as top Democrats: poll
© Greg Nash

A new poll shows that freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezWomen's March endorses Nina Turner in first-ever electoral endorsement Grassley pressured to run as Democrats set sights on Iowa JD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians MORE is about as well-known as top political figures, according to a new poll.

The Morning Consult/Politico survey released Wednesday found that just 22 percent of registered voters had never heard of Ocasio-Cortez.

By comparison, 20 percent of registered voters had never heard of Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck Schumer84 mayors call for immigration to be included in reconciliation Senate infrastructure talks on shaky grounds Could Andrew Cuomo — despite scandals — be re-elected because of Trump? MORE (D-N.Y.) and 21 percent had never heard of presidential candidate Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisWant to improve vaccine rates? Ask for this endorsement Biden celebrates anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act Will Pence primary Trump — and win? MORE (D-Calif.).

Since she defeated longterm congressman Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyCynthia Nixon backs primary challenger to Rep. Carolyn Maloney The Hill's Morning Report - McConnell pressures Dem leaders to follow Biden's infrastructure lead The Memo: The center strikes back MORE (N.Y.) in the 2018 Democratic primary, Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.) has dominated headlines and been a constant feature of political discourse. 

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The survey also found that Ocasio-Cortez was the most well-known member of the "Squad," a group of four progressive Democratic congresswomen that in recent weeks was the subject of a series of online attacks by President TrumpDonald TrumpRealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Jake Ellzey defeats Trump-backed candidate in Texas House runoff DOJ declines to back Mo Brooks's defense against Swalwell's Capitol riot lawsuit MORE. Thirty-four percent had never heard of Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOvernight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week Omar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy MORE (D-Minn.), 41 percent had never heard of Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOmar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy House passes bill requiring EPA to regulate 'forever chemicals' in drinking water Ohio becomes battleground for rival Democratic factions MORE (D-Mich.) and 51 percent had never heard of Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyOn The Money: Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause | IMF estimates 6 percent global growth this year Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause and wipe out K per borrower Omar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy MORE (D-Mass.).

The poll also showed Harris had less name recognition than other top Democratic presidential candidates. Compared to Harris, fewer people had not heard of Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause | IMF estimates 6 percent global growth this year Schumer, Warren call on Biden to extend student loan pause and wipe out K per borrower Senate confirms Biden's Air Force secretary MORE (14 percent), Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWomen's March endorses Nina Turner in first-ever electoral endorsement GOP sees debt ceiling as its leverage against Biden Democrats brace for slog on Biden's spending plan MORE (3 percent) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenRealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Iowa governor suggests immigrants partially to blame for rising COVID-19 cases Biden officials pledge to confront cybersecurity challenges head-on MORE (3 percent). 

Researchers surveyed 1,992 registered voters registered voters between July 19-21. The results have a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.