Ocasio-Cortez about as well known as top Democrats: poll
© Greg Nash

A new poll shows that freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBernie Sanders has been most-followed member of Congress on social media for six years Meghan McCain responds to Katie Couric: 'I don't need to be deprogrammed' Skepticism reigns as Biden, McConnell begin new era MORE is about as well-known as top political figures, according to a new poll.

The Morning Consult/Politico survey released Wednesday found that just 22 percent of registered voters had never heard of Ocasio-Cortez.

By comparison, 20 percent of registered voters had never heard of Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerMcConnell: Power-sharing deal can proceed after Manchin, Sinema back filibuster Justice watchdog to probe whether officials sought to interfere with election Capitol insurrection fallout: A PATRIOT Act 2.0? MORE (D-N.Y.) and 21 percent had never heard of presidential candidate Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisInaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models Overnight Defense: Biden lifts Trump's transgender military ban | Democrats, advocates celebrate end of ban | 5,000 guardsmen staying in DC through mid-March The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - GOP senator retires MORE (D-Calif.).

Since she defeated longterm congressman Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyBottom line Biden's gain is Democratic baseball's loss with Cedric Richmond Business groups breathe sigh of relief over prospect of divided government MORE (N.Y.) in the 2018 Democratic primary, Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.) has dominated headlines and been a constant feature of political discourse. 

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The survey also found that Ocasio-Cortez was the most well-known member of the "Squad," a group of four progressive Democratic congresswomen that in recent weeks was the subject of a series of online attacks by President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE. Thirty-four percent had never heard of Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDemocrats poised to impeach Trump again Pence opposes removing Trump under 25th Amendment: reports Pelosi vows to impeach Trump again — if Pence doesn't remove him first MORE (D-Minn.), 41 percent had never heard of Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBiden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs Overnight Energy: EPA rule exempts many polluting industries from future air regulations | Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report | Officials ousted from White House after papers casting doubt on climate science Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report MORE (D-Mich.) and 51 percent had never heard of Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyBelfast's Troubles echo in today's Washington Federal government carries out 13th and final execution under Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Biden asks Congress to expand largest relief response in U.S. history MORE (D-Mass.).

The poll also showed Harris had less name recognition than other top Democratic presidential candidates. Compared to Harris, fewer people had not heard of Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTim Ryan says he's 'looking seriously' at running for Portman's Senate seat Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial Skepticism reigns as Biden, McConnell begin new era MORE (14 percent), Vermont Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTim Ryan says he's 'looking seriously' at running for Portman's Senate seat Bernie Sanders has been most-followed member of Congress on social media for six years This week: Senate stuck in limbo MORE (3 percent) and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE (3 percent). 

Researchers surveyed 1,992 registered voters registered voters between July 19-21. The results have a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points.