The Kentucky Democratic Party on Wednesday launched a “Moscow Mitch” online store, making use of a nickname handed to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTwo years after Harvey's devastation, the wake-up call has not been heeded McGrath releases ad blasting McConnell with coal miners in Kentucky: 'Which side are you on?' Prediction: 2020 election is set to be hacked, if we don't act fast MORE (R-Ky.) over his blocking of election security legislation.

The party’s online store is promoting red buttons, vinyl stickers, a T-shirt and a cossack hat, all decorated with the phrase, “Just say nyet! to Moscow Mitch,” in Soviet-style lettering.

The nickname comes after McConnell last week blocked two election security bills, despite warnings from intelligence officials and former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE that Russian interference in the 2020 election was likely to take place.

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One of the bills would require the use of paper ballots, and the other would require candidates, campaigns or family members to notify the FBI about assistance offers from foreign governments.

The majority leader's move prompted widespread backlash. 

MSNBC host and former GOP congressman Joe ScarboroughCharles (Joe) Joseph ScarboroughGOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Pelosi refers to McConnell as 'Moscow Mitch' Scarborough criticized for retweeting account claiming 'no way' Epstein's death was suicide MORE later called McConnell’s actions “un-American,” labeling the Kentucky lawmaker “Moscow Mitch” and accusing him of "aiding and abetting Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinUS and Russia arms race would be detrimental to strategic stability Five things to watch as Trump heads to G-7 summit Biden blasts Trump's 'embarrassing' actions heading into G-7 summit MORE’s ongoing attempts to subvert American democracy.”

The hashtag #MoscowMitch quickly took off on social media, and several other hashtags and phrases, including #MoscowMitchMcTreason and “Mitch McConnell is a Russian” have trended on Twitter after the senator defended his decision to block the bills.

McConnell hit back on Monday, comparing the attacks against him to “modern-day McCarthyism” and blasting critics for using “unhinged smears.”

“These theatrical requests happen all the time here on the Senate. I promise that nobody involved, including my friend the Democratic leader who made the request, actually thought he’d get a Republican Senate to instantly, unanimously pass a bill that got one Republican vote over in the House,” McConnell said from the Senate floor. 

“It doesn’t make Republicans traitors or un-American. It makes us policymakers with a different opinion,” he added.

McConnell's campaign appropriated the nickname on Tuesday for a drink recommendation mocking Democrats ahead of their presidential primary debate:

The Hill has reached out to McConnell's office for further comment.