Cambridge Analytica whistleblower's book coming out next week
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Christopher Wylie, the whistleblower who revealed that data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica harvested data from Facebook users’ profiles without permission for political advertising, is reportedly set to publish a book about the scandal through Random House.

The publishing house will release Wylie’s book, “Mindf*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America” on Oct. 8, according to The Associated Press. Random House touts it as “both exposé and dire warning” about the potential to manipulate people through online data.

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Last year, Wylie, a former research director at the firm, gave the Observer newspaper a number of internal documents and accused the company of illegally accessing millions of Facebook users’ personal information in support of both President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Trump to hold outdoor rally in New Hampshire on Saturday Eighty-eight years of debt pieties MORE’s and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Trump administration grants funding extension for Texas testing sites Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE’s (R-Texas) presidential campaigns.

Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergHillicon Valley: Senate panel advances bill targeting online child sexual abuse | Trump administration awards tech group contract to build 'virtual' wall | Advocacy groups urge Congress to ban facial recognition technologies Facebook to launch Fourth of July voter registration drive Hillicon Valley: Facebook claims it 'does not profit from hate' in open letter | Analysis finds most of Facebook's top advertisers have not joined boycott | Research finds Uighurs targeted by Chinese spyware as part of surveillance campaign MORE, who was summoned to testify before Congress, personally apologized for the handling of the data and the Federal Trade Commission fined the social media giant about $5 billion to settle the matter this July.