Cambridge Analytica whistleblower's book coming out next week
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Christopher Wylie, the whistleblower who revealed that data-mining firm Cambridge Analytica harvested data from Facebook users’ profiles without permission for political advertising, is reportedly set to publish a book about the scandal through Random House.

The publishing house will release Wylie’s book, “Mindf*ck: Cambridge Analytica and the Plot to Break America” on Oct. 8, according to The Associated Press. Random House touts it as “both exposé and dire warning” about the potential to manipulate people through online data.

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Last year, Wylie, a former research director at the firm, gave the Observer newspaper a number of internal documents and accused the company of illegally accessing millions of Facebook users’ personal information in support of both President TrumpDonald John TrumpGeraldo Rivera on Trump sowing election result doubts: 'Enough is enough now' Murkowski: Trump should concede White House race Scott Atlas resigns as coronavirus adviser to Trump MORE’s and Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration proceeds with rollback of bird protections despite objections | Trump banking proposal on fossil fuels sparks backlash from libertarians | EU 2019 greenhouse gas emissions down 24 percent Trump's NATO ambassador pledges 'seamless' transition to Biden administration Potential 2024 Republicans flock to Georgia amid Senate runoffs MORE’s (R-Texas) presidential campaigns.

Facebook CEO Mark ZuckerbergMark Elliot ZuckerbergDemocrats urge YouTube to remove election misinformation, step up efforts ahead of Georgia runoff Democrats press Facebook, Twitter on misinformation efforts ahead of Georgia runoff Hillicon Valley: Facebook content moderators demand more workplace protections | Ousted cyber official blasts Giuliani press conference | Tech firms fall short on misinformation targeting Latino vote MORE, who was summoned to testify before Congress, personally apologized for the handling of the data and the Federal Trade Commission fined the social media giant about $5 billion to settle the matter this July.