Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program
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Nine U.S. lawmakers, all of whom have used food stamp programs in the past, have signed on to a letter urging President TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE to turn away from his proposed $15 billion in cuts to the program. 

In a letter sent Thursday to President Trump, Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurraySchumer kicks into reelection mode Democrats target Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act Senators eye rollback of Trump methane rule with Congressional Review Act MORE (D-Wash.) joined Reps. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiHillicon Valley: Intel heads to resume threats hearing scrapped under Trump | New small business coalition to urge action on antitrust policy | Amazon backs corporate tax hike to pay for infrastructure House panel investigating YouTube for advertising practices on kids' platform From one 'big house' to another: DOJ must hold the leaders of Purdue Pharma accountable MORE (D-Ill,), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibProgressives push Fed to drive funding away from fossil fuel companies Omar on arrest of Georgia state lawmaker: 'Wild and completely unacceptable' Ocasio-Cortez endorses Turner in Ohio special election MORE (D-Mich.), Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyDemocrats spar over COVID-19 vaccine strategy Lawmakers emphasize prioritizing patients' needs in health care policy The Hill's Morning Report - Democrats ready mammoth relief bill for 10-day sprint MORE (D-Ill.), Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalCapitol riots spark fear of Trump's military powers in final days House Democrats push Biden's Pentagon pick on civilian control of military GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (D-Calif.), Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreLawmakers urge IRS to boost outreach about tax credits for low-income Americans McMorris Rodgers floats vacating Speaker's chair over Democrat's in-person vote after COVID diagnosis House approves rules package for new Congress MORE (D-Wis.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeBiden funding decision inflames debate over textbooks for Palestinian refugees 10 Democrats join NAACP lawsuit against Trump White House delays release of budget plan MORE (D-Calif.), Jahana HayesJahana HayesHarris holds first meeting in ceremonial office with CBC members Parents of Sandy Hook victims slam Taylor Greene's appointment to Education Committee GOP has growing Marjorie Taylor Greene problem MORE (D-Conn.) and Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsOfficials discuss proposals for fixing deep disparities in education digital divide The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - At 50 days in charge, Democrats hail American Rescue Plan as major win House Democrats call on Biden to fill Postal Service Board vacancies to pave way for ousting DeJoy MORE (D-N.C.) in asking the administration to remove “all intended cuts” to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from its budget. 

“We are writing today on behalf of the over 36 million American families who currently depend on SNAP, like ours once did, to make ends meet and help the next generation achieve upward mobility,” the lawmakers wrote.

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While the president’s budget proposal is unlikely to become law, the administration has already introduced tightened requirements for the program projected to remove nearly 70,000 people from SNAP.

Krishnamoorthi, who said his family briefly used the program after immigrating from India in the 1970s, said it was vital to let the White House know “you really are touching on a support system that a broader swath of society utilizes than you may think.”

The cuts are part of a proposed 6 percent reduction in domestic spending in the budget, which also includes cuts to housing assistance and controversial work requirements to Medicaid.