Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program
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Nine U.S. lawmakers, all of whom have used food stamp programs in the past, have signed on to a letter urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpWinners and losers from the South Carolina debate Five takeaways from the Democratic debate Democrats duke it out in most negative debate so far MORE to turn away from his proposed $15 billion in cuts to the program. 

In a letter sent Thursday to President Trump, Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayLawmakers raise alarms over Trump coronavirus response Public health experts raise alarm as coronavirus spreads Overnight Health Care: Senate panel to hold hearing on US coronavirus response | Dems demand Trump withdraw religious provider rule | Trump Medicaid proposal sparks bipartisan backlash MORE (D-Wash.) joined Reps. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiHillicon Valley: Barr threatens tech's prized legal shield | House panel seeks information from Amazon's Ring | Trump DOJ backs Oracle in Supreme Court fight against Google | TikTok unveils new safety controls House subcommittee requests information from Ring about cooperation with police, local governments Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program MORE (D-Ill,), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOmar offers sneak peek at her forthcoming memoir Sanders wins endorsement of top Muslim group Don't let 'welfare for all' advocates derail administration's food stamp program reforms MORE (D-Mich.), Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyLawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program Hillicon Valley: FCC moves against Huawei, ZTE | Dem groups ask Google to reconsider ads policy | Bill introduced to increase data access during probes Dems call out Oracle for lack of diversity on its board MORE (D-Ill.), Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalLawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program House Democrat: 'Trump needs to give more consideration to the safety of our troops' Lawmakers react, predict Trump's next move MORE (D-Calif.), Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreLawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program Democratic convention host committee under investigation over concerns about 'work environment': report A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal MORE (D-Wis.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeCalifornia lawmakers mark Day of Remembrance for Japanese internment Senior black Democrats urge party chairman to take responsibility for Iowa Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program MORE (D-Calif.), Jahana HayesJahana HayesLawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program FBI visits congressional candidate Robert Hyde's home, business Ukraine launches criminal investigation into alleged threats against former US Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch MORE (D-Conn.) and Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsBiden cinches support from third NC House Democrat Republicans push for reducing regulatory costs to tackle affordable housing crisis Lawmakers paint different pictures of Trump's 'opportunity zone' program MORE (D-N.C.) in asking the administration to remove “all intended cuts” to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from its budget. 

“We are writing today on behalf of the over 36 million American families who currently depend on SNAP, like ours once did, to make ends meet and help the next generation achieve upward mobility,” the lawmakers wrote.

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While the president’s budget proposal is unlikely to become law, the administration has already introduced tightened requirements for the program projected to remove nearly 70,000 people from SNAP.

Krishnamoorthi, who said his family briefly used the program after immigrating from India in the 1970s, said it was vital to let the White House know “you really are touching on a support system that a broader swath of society utilizes than you may think.”

The cuts are part of a proposed 6 percent reduction in domestic spending in the budget, which also includes cuts to housing assistance and controversial work requirements to Medicaid.