Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program
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Nine U.S. lawmakers, all of whom have used food stamp programs in the past, have signed on to a letter urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpHR McMaster says president's policy to withdraw troops from Afghanistan is 'unwise' Cast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response MORE to turn away from his proposed $15 billion in cuts to the program. 

In a letter sent Thursday to President Trump, Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayTrump health officials grilled over reports of politics in COVID-19 response CDC director pushes back on Caputo claim of 'resistance unit' at agency The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (D-Wash.) joined Reps. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiDemocratic chairman says White House blocked Navarro from testifying Democrats urge CDC to update guidance to encourage colleges, universities go tobacco-free Trump says people 'in the dark shadows' are controlling Biden MORE (D-Ill,), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibGeorge Conway: 'Trump is like a practical joke that got out of hand' Pelosi endorses Kennedy in Massachusetts Senate primary challenge The Democratic Party platform represents our big tent MORE (D-Mich.), Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyRep. Robin Kelly enters race for Democratic caucus vice chair Hillicon Valley: Oracle confirms deal with TikTok to be 'trusted technology provider' | QAnon spreads across globe, shadowing COVID-19 | VA hit by data breach impacting 46,000 veterans House approves bill to secure internet-connected federal devices against cyber threats MORE (D-Ill.), Salud CarbajalSalud CarbajalNunes opponent pins hopes on shifting demographics in uphill battle Democratic lawmakers launch 'Mean Girls'-inspired initiative to promote face masks Federal employees push for COVID-19 protections in 'dangerous' workplaces MORE (D-Calif.), Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreTexas Democrat: US natural gas vital in transition to renewables The Hill's Convention Report: Democratic National Convention kicks off virtually The Hill's 12:30 Report: Postal Service crisis escalates MORE (D-Wis.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeSteph, Ayesha Curry to be recognized by the Congressional Hunger Center Democrats unveil plan declaring racism a public health issue With Biden, advocates sense momentum for lifting abortion funding ban MORE (D-Calif.), Jahana HayesJahana HayesMichelle Obama wishes Barack a happy birthday: 'My favorite guy' Gun control group rolls out House endorsements Human Rights Campaign rolls out congressional endorsements on Equality Act anniversary MORE (D-Conn.) and Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Lauren Underwood Congresswoman accidentally tweets of death of Rep. John Lewis, who's still alive Help reverse devastating health disparities by supporting the Black Maternal Health Momnibus Act MORE (D-N.C.) in asking the administration to remove “all intended cuts” to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) from its budget. 

“We are writing today on behalf of the over 36 million American families who currently depend on SNAP, like ours once did, to make ends meet and help the next generation achieve upward mobility,” the lawmakers wrote.

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While the president’s budget proposal is unlikely to become law, the administration has already introduced tightened requirements for the program projected to remove nearly 70,000 people from SNAP.

Krishnamoorthi, who said his family briefly used the program after immigrating from India in the 1970s, said it was vital to let the White House know “you really are touching on a support system that a broader swath of society utilizes than you may think.”

The cuts are part of a proposed 6 percent reduction in domestic spending in the budget, which also includes cuts to housing assistance and controversial work requirements to Medicaid.