Disneyland Paris opens amid global pandemic
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Disneyland Paris partially reopened Wednesday, the latest European tourist spot to emerge from the months-long coronavirus lockdown.

The theme park, Europe’s most-attended, will begin a phased reopening that features managed attendance levels, reduced capacity and increased cleaning and disinfecting procedures, USA Today reported.

The reopening comes four months after the park closed its gates due to the pandemic, which has infected more than 209,000 people in France and killed more than 30,000, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

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Another pillar of the French tourism industry, the Eiffel Tower, meanwhile, will reopen its top floor on Wednesday. The tower began the reopening process in late June after its longest closure since World War II, initially only allowing visitors on the first and second floors.

“Last year, during the same period we welcomed 23,000 people everyday. When we opened the Eiffel Tower, the first weekend we welcomed 5,000 people ... and last weekend 10,000 people,” the monument’s managing director, Patrick Branco Ruivo, said, according to USA Today.

“That’s why for us we are optimistic for this summer even if the conditions are different. ... It’s a message of hope about COVID-19, that even if the conditions are not always very easy,” he added.

The tower will allow a maximum of 250 people at a time on its top floor, according to the newspaper.

Tourism is a major industry for the city. The country recorded almost 90 million overnight arrivals from tourists and visitors in 2018.

The Disney announcement comes as the theme park’s U.S. counterparts have struggled with the reopening process. The company’s theme parks in California, which is currently experiencing spikes in the virus, postponed reopening after initially planning it for July 17.

“Given the time required for us to bring thousands of cast members back to work and restart our business, we have no choice but to delay the reopening of our theme parks and resort hotels until we receive approval from government officials,” Disney said in a statement.