President Biden's approval rating has dipped 6 points since April, according to a new poll, as Congress weighs his sprawling spending plans.

Biden drew positive marks from 48 percent of Americans in a Monmouth University poll published Wednesday, down from 54 percent who approved of the job he was doing in April.

The president's approval rating has dropped among Democrats the past few months, as negotiations drag on over an infrastructure package, while it has increased among Republicans.

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The latest survey found that 86 percent of Democrats approve of the job Biden is doing, down 9 points from April. Support among independents is also down, from 47 percent to 36 percent. 

Meanwhile, support among Republicans jumped 8 points, from 11 percent to 19 percent.

“Biden’s rating is still in net positive territory, but it seems to have taken a dip with the growing uncertainty that his signature spending plans will be enacted,” Patrick Murray, director of the independent Monmouth University Polling Institute, said in a statement. 

The survey found broad support for Biden's proposed spending plans. According to the poll, 60 percent of Americans said they supported the COVID-19 stimulus relief passed during his term, while 68 percent supported his infrastructure package proposal.

Additionally, 61 percent said they supported Biden’s proposal to expand health care and child care while providing paid leave and college tuition support.

Still, the poll found that a whopping 71 percent of respondents are concerned that Biden's spending proposals could result in inflation.

That includes 47 percent of Americans who said they were “very concerned” that spending for these plans could lead to higher prices for goods and services and 24 percent who said they were “somewhat concerned.” Seventeen percent of respondents said they were "not too concerned" while 11 percent said they weren’t concerned at all.

“Concerns about possible inflation do not appear to undercut overall public support for these spending plans. That might be because many Americans expect the pros will outweigh the cons,” Murray said in the statement. 

The survey of 810 U.S. adults was conducted June 9-14 via landlines and cellphones and has a margin of error of 3.5 points.