A Republican National Committee official from Florida spread multiple COVID-19 vaccine conspiracy theories, even referring to the inoculations as “the mark of the beast,” according to a CNN KFile investigation.

Peter Feaman, the national committeeman from Florida, made the comments on his blog “The Backhoe Chronicles,” according to the report.

In May, Feeman referred to the vaccines as “a mark of the beast,” according to the report, a reference to the Bible and the book of Revelations. The mark represents showing allegiance to Satan.

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He further said Michigan Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerDemocratic senator requests tech company policies on extremist content Governors brace for 2022 after year in pandemic spotlight Protesters crash former Detroit police chief's gubernatorial announcement event MORE (D) was “diabolical” for promoting vaccines.

“Diabolical Michigan Governor Whiter wants her citizens to get the Mark of the Beast to participate in society,” Feaman wrote, according to CNN, which provided screenshots of the posts.

“Now the Michigan Democrat has announced that she is going to prolong the state's suffering until residents submit to getting 'the jab' and if enough of them comply with her demands, then she and Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse clears bill to provide veterans with cost-of-living adjustment On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default To reduce poverty, stop burdening the poor: What Joe Manchin gets wrong about the child tax credit MORE might permit them to celebrate Fourth of July,” he continued.

He added, “Hey Governor Whitmer-We will not bow to your false god.” 

In another post from July 20, Feeman suggested that government officials would go to people's home and ask for their vaccination status, referring to the government as the “Biden brown shirts.”

“The Biden brown shirts are beginning to show up at private homes questioning vaccine papers,” Feaman wrote.

On Thursday, Feeman criticized wearing masks indoors, saying “the wolves want control and power.”

“As for me and my house — we will fight them,” Feaman said.

Feaman didn’t return CNN’s request for comment. But when asked about the report, he responded to The South Florida Sun-Sentinel in a text message calling the reporting “fake news.”

The Hill has reached out to the Republican National Committee for comment.

The report comes as Florida sees a worsening coronavirus outbreak and becomes the U.S. epicenter amid the rise of the delta variant. The state broke its record for hospitalizations on Sunday, recording more than 10,200.

The state logged 21,683 new cases that day, the highest since the start of the pandemic.