President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaHead of North Carolina's health department steps down Appeals court appears wary of Trump's suit to block documents from Jan. 6 committee Patent trolls kill startups, but the Biden administration has the power to help  MORE announced Thursday the charities to which he'd be donating his Nobel Peace Prize winnings, giving the most to a military charity and earthquake relief in Haiti.

Obama split his $1.4 million in winnings between 10 charities, after having been awarded the Peace Prize in October of 2009.

The president said he'd donate $250,000 to Fisher House, a nonprofit that helps provide housing to families of military patients receiving care at VA hospitals, as well as another $200,000 to the Clinton-Bush Haiti Fund, the fund headed by the former presidents to organize earthquake relief to Haiti.

“These organizations do extraordinary work in the United States and abroad helping students, veterans and countless others in need,” Obama said in a statement. “I’m proud to support their work.”

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Obama gave six-figure sums to eight other charities.

The president gave $125,000 to College Summit, a nonprofit to help prepare elementary and middle-school students for graduating high school and going to college.

The Posse Foundation, which provides scholarships to high school students, received $125,000, as did the United Negro College Fund, the Hispanic Scholarship Fund, and the American Indian College Fund.

The president donated the same $125,000 amount to the Appalachian Leadership and Education Foundation, which encourages students in Appalachia to pursue higher education through scholarships.

The president also looked abroad in spreading his peace prize winnings.

Obama gave $100,000 to Africare, an organization providing assistance in African nations in health and HIV/AIDS, food security and agriculture, and water resource development.

He also donated $100,000 to the Central Asia Institute, which promotes community-based education with an emphasis on young girls, in rural areas in Pakistan and Afghanistan.