The Bush administration consistently violated the law requiring the White House to keep the intelligence committees in Congress fully informed, Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHillicon Valley: Google to limit political ad targeting | Senators scrutinize self-driving car safety | Trump to 'look at' Apple tariff exemption | Progressive lawmakers call for surveillance reforms | House panel advances telecom bills Democrats raise privacy concerns over Amazon home security system Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny MORE (D-Ore.) insinuated Friday.

Wyden appeared on MSNBC to defend House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiKlobuchar shuts down idea a woman can't beat Trump: 'Pelosi does it every day' Budowsky: Trump destroying GOP in 2018, '19, '20 On The Money: Senate scraps plan to force second shutdown vote | Trump tax breaks for low-income neighborhoods draw scrutiny | McConnell rips House Dems for holding up trade deal MORE's (D-Calif.) claims that the CIA had misled Congress in its intelligence briefings, and alleged that the previous administration had failed to comply with laws on briefings.

"I can't speculate on what Nancy Pelosi was told at that time," Wyden said. "What I can tell you is there is a 1947 law that says all the members of the Intelligence Committee must be kept currently and fully informed, and the Bush administration consistently didn't comply with that law."

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(A background on that law and congressinal briefings can be found here.)

Wyden sought to redirect some of the heat now on Pelosi against the Bush administration, accusing them of falling short in their obligation to members of Congress, including Pelosi.

Wyden said that some lawmakers had actually written the Bush administration as early as 2006 to register their displeasure in U.S. interrogation tactics, a letter which he said they hope to declassify.

The Oregon Democrat also said he agreed with former Vice President Cheney's demands that Bush-era memos on interrogation programs should be declassified.

"I will tell you, I find it hard to believe why the vice president is so convinced that those documents support his position," Wyden said. "But as far as I'm concerned, most of that information ought to be declassified so we can get beyond this 'he said, she said' business."