News/Legislation/Healthcare

4 in 10 have returned to ‘normal, pre-COVID-19 life’: survey

FILE – The headquarters of the German biotechnology company “BioNTech” is pictured in Mainz, Germany, March 30, 2022. BioNTech, which teamed with Pfizer to develop the first widely used COVID-19 vaccine, has reported higher revenue and net profit in the first half of the year. The German pharmaceutical company said Monday Aug. 8, 2022, that it expects demand to grow as it releases updated vaccines to target new omicron strains. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

Four in 10 Americans surveyed in a new poll said that they have returned to their “normal, pre-COVID-19 life.”

The University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg Public Policy Center (APPC) conducted the survey of 1,580 American adults from July 12 to 18, finding that 41 percent have returned to pre-COVID-19 lives and 36 percent expect to return to “normal” lives within the next few months, the next year or following years.

Almost a quarter — 23 percent — said they expect that they will “never” return to a pre-COVID-19 rhythm.

The percentage of Americans who said they have returned to their pre-pandemic lifestyles is almost 10 higher than in April. Just 16 percent said the same thing in January.

Respondents in the new survey were split when asked if they are worried about a family member’s health being seriously affected by COVID-19, with 49 percent saying they are not worried and 48 percent saying they are.

A majority — 59 percent — said that they are not worried about their own health; however, 39 percent maintained that they are still worried about contracting the virus.

Fifty-four percent also said that they had COVID-19 or are “pretty sure they had it” in the months since early April.

And more than half of the Americans questioned — 54 percent — said that they personally know someone who has died from COVID-19, and the same percentage said that they rarely or never wear a mask inside around people who are not a part of their household.

The new survey has a margin of error of 3.3 percentage points.

Tags
See all Hill.TV See all Video