This week the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) announced it has created a new ‘alternative compliance path’ in its Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building rating system. While USGBC focused its announcement on the fact that this new path will discourage illegally sourced wood, what it really does, is open the door for builders to use more responsibly sourced building materials, including wood from family forests certified by the American Tree Farm System (ATFS) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI).

This news, that LEED will now accept wood from ATFS and SFI certified forests, is truly a milestone for family woodland owners, Tree Farmers, forestry leaders and forest conservation in America. And we have many Members of Congress to thank for this, especially Representatives Gregg Harper (R-MS), Kurt Schrader (D-OR), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances House fails to override Trump veto on border wall MORE (R-WA), Sanford Bishop (D-GA), Glenn Thompson (R-PA), Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTop Republican releases full transcript of Bruce Ohr interview It’s time for Congress to pass an anti-cruelty statute DOJ opinion will help protect kids from dangers of online gambling MORE (R-VA), as well as Senators Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Democratic state AGs sue to block T-Mobile-Sprint merger | House kicks off tech antitrust probe | Maine law shakes up privacy debate | Senators ask McConnell to bring net neutrality to a vote Lawmakers demand answers on Border Patrol data breach Senators call on McConnell to bring net neutrality rules to a vote MORE (R-MS), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharJuan Williams: Warren on the rise Progressive group launches campaign to identify voters who switch to Warren 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the first Democratic showdown MORE (D-MN), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump turns the page back to Mueller probe Trump praises Thad Cochran: 'A real senator with incredible values' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump, Democrats deal with Mueller fallout MORE (R-MS), Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Angus KingAngus Stanley KingSenator takes spontaneous roadtrip with strangers after canceled flight On The Money: Economy adds 75K jobs in May | GOP senator warns tariffs will wipe out tax cuts | Trump says 'good chance' of deal with Mexico Trump administration appeals ruling that blocked offshore Arctic drilling MORE (I-ME) and John BoozmanJohn Nichols BoozmanVA chief pressed on efforts to prevent veteran suicides McConnell ups pressure on White House to get a budget deal There is a severe physician shortage and it will only worsen MORE (R-AR) just to name a few, who led letters upon letters on this issue.

While some may note that LEED is a private sector standard, much of the federal government uses or has adopted the LEED rating system or the Green Building Initiative’s Green Globes rating system for use in its policies for building constrution.

In addition, family landowners make up the largest ownership group of forests in the U.S., collectively owning more than one-third of the forests across the country, more than the federal government or corporations. These 22 million families and individuals, whether they own ten or 100 acres, steward our forests, providing local sustainable wood fiber while also conserving clean water and air, wildlife habitat, and ensuring the overall health of our forests.

That is why more than 100 members of Congress, as well as dozens of governors, state foresters and state legislators helped the American Forest Foundation by weighing in on the issue over the past few years, expressing concern to USGBC that the LEED rating system failed to recognize and support wood use from their states’ residents who were voluntarily doing right by the land.

Now, USGBC’s new path will level the playing field in the market and reduce barriers to using wood products when the federal government uses the LEED system.

And that is not the only posititive outcome.

This new path encourages the use of more American-grown wood. Previously, USGBC only recognized wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). With more than 80 million acres certified by ATFS and SFI in the U.S., and 33 million acres certified by FSC, opening LEED to ATFS and SFI, in addition to FSC, means more American-grown wood products can be used. 

Stimulating markets for wood products ultimately helps family landowners to continue to conserve their forests. Annually, landowners incur costs for management practices.  Markets that want sustainably managed wood, encourage landowners to earn income to replant, restore and keep forests as forests. This recognition could have a real impact in the marketplace as some estimate that half the commercial buildings in the U.S. are being built today to a green standard.

While this announcement is progress, there is still more we can do to encourage wood use.  Wood products used in construction store carbon and emit fewer greenhouse gas emissions when manufactured, when compared to alternatives like steel and concrete.  

As officials continue to find ways to offset emissions, building green can help. Today, policies still exist that discourage the use of American grown wood, such as the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) recent federal procurement guidelines that leave out wood from ATFS or SFI certified forests. If we are to conserve our forests for the long-term, especially our family-owned lands, we must remove unneccessary barriers that prevent wood use.


Martin is president and CEO of the American Forest Foundation.