Mike Pompeo is the right man for the State Department
© Greg Nash

The horrendous chemical weapon attack by Syrian president Assad against his own people reminds us that the world remains a dangerous place.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rallies in Nevada amid Supreme Court flurry: 'We're gonna get Brett' Trump: 'Good news' that Obama is campaigning again Trump boosts Heller, hammers 'Wacky Jacky' opponent in Nevada MORE needs a full national security team on the job to continue a strong foreign policy that puts America first. The secretary of State is a vital part of this team.

ADVERTISEMENT

The president’s choice, Director of Central Intelligence Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Trump identifies first soldier remains from North Korea | New cyber strategy lets US go on offense | Army chief downplays talk of 'Fort Trump' Pompeo backed continued US support in Yemen war over objections from staff: report Pompeo’s staff cracks down on ‘correct use of commas’ at State Dept MORE, understands that safety and security at home require a world that is peaceful and stable.

Mike Pompeo has the intelligence, the integrity, and the experience to serve as America’s secretary of State. As a former member of Congress, he understands how policy decisions get made – and the key importance of congressional oversight.

As head of the CIA, he understands the crucial role that the intelligence community plays in preserving America’s national security. As a soldier and West Point graduate, he understands the consequences of decisions that get made in Washington, D.C. And as a Harvard-trained lawyer, he understands and respects the rule of law.

Mike knows the issues, he knows the people, and he is the right person for this job. He will be an excellent representative for our nation, and a seasoned veteran to implement President Trump’s foreign policy.

Just last year, he was confirmed by a large, bipartisan majority to be CIA director. Fifteen senators from the other side of the aisle agreed that Mike Pompeo was the right choice for the position.

Now, Senate Democrats who claim to want diplomacy, seem ready to deny the president his chief diplomat.

We need to restore America to the position we once held as the most powerful and respected nation on the face of the earth. For eight years, the previous administration took the wrong approach. The Obama administration followed a policy it called ‘strategic patience.’

That meant watching while the Assad regime in Syria crossed one “red line” after another. Those red lines became a green light to murder innocent civilians.

The previous administration’s policy meant North Korea was permitted to test nuclear weapons and missiles without reprisal. It meant striking a nuclear deal with Iran in order to leave a desired presidential legacy while leaving others to deal with the consequences.

The leaders of Syria, North Korea and Iran – and others like them – need to understand that their belligerence will not succeed. They need a clear message that America has a new foreign policy – one that secures our national interests and demonstrates our leadership around the world. Part of that leadership is standing up to show that there is a limit to the patience of civilized countries.

When it comes to issues like the upcoming discussions with North Korea, Mike Pompeo understands the risks of dealing with aggressive adversaries. His recent mission to meet with Kim Jong Un shows that he is already a trusted emissary on the world stage.

Mike Pompeo’s nomination gives us a chance to send a clear message to our allies and our adversaries. We need to confirm him and let him get to work.

Deliberate Democratic delays serve no point and put Americans at risk. In Russia, Syria, North Korea, Iran and other places, America’s cunning, aggressive and opportunistic adversaries are watching closely.

The Trump administration has begun to get us back on the right track. Mike Pompeo will ensure that we stay there.

Barrasso, a Republican senator from Wyoming, is a member of Senate Republican leadership and sits on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.