Every April 15th reminds us of the necessity of raising revenue to operate our government.  Most will agree that taxes are the price we pay for a civilized society.  It is not that we have to pay taxes that makes us hate “tax day,” but rather the fact that we have to pay so much.  Simply put, the Federal government should spend less so that we are not taxed so much.  However, under the proposed budget of President Obama and the Democratic Majority in Congress, we are moving in the wrong direction.

Erwin Griswold, former solicitor general under Presidents Johnson and Nixon, once said, “We have long had death and taxes as the two standards of inevitability.  But there are those who believe that death is the preferable of the two.  At least, as one man said, there's one advantage about death; it doesn't get worse every time Congress meets.”

Unfortunately, the proposed Obama budget would lead to taxes getting worse.  In fact, they would get much worse, and not just for the so-called “well-off and well-connected,” as the budget refers to those who are targeted for explicit tax increases.

Rather than cut taxes for 95 percent of Americans, as the President promised, the budget includes a number of tax increases that would directly and indirectly hit lower and middle income wage earners, as well as the so-called wealthy.  These increases would come in the form of a huge new tax on America's industrial output and energy, which would be passed on to every consumer.  And, they would have the effect of an all-out assault on America's job creation ability and our global competiveness.

I plan to introduce legislation that would install a cap of 20 percent of GDP on all future spending, which is about the historical average.  Lower spending should lead to lower taxes and I am convinced a hard cap on spending may be the only answer that Washington politicians understand.  We need to instill fiscal constraints to ensure a responsible budget.

Washington should do what millions of other Americans are doing to weather the financial storm – find ways to cut and make do with less.  By cutting wasteful spending, eliminating ineffective government programs, and dealing with our long-term entitlement crisis, we can put our fiscal house in order without raising taxes.

Every April 15th reminds us of the necessity of raising revenue to operate our government.  Most will agree that taxes are the price we pay for a civilized society.  It is not that we have to pay taxes that makes us hate “tax day,” but rather the fact that we have to pay so much.  Simply put, the Federal government should spend less so that we are not taxed so much.  However, under the proposed budget of President Obama and the Democratic Majority in Congress, we are moving in the wrong direction.

Erwin Griswold, former solicitor general under Presidents Johnson and Nixon, once said, “We have long had death and taxes as the two standards of inevitability.  But there are those who believe that death is the preferable of the two.  At least, as one man said, there's one advantage about death; it doesn't get worse every time Congress meets.”

Unfortunately, the proposed Obama budget would lead to taxes getting worse.  In fact, they would get much worse, and not just for the so-called “well-off and well-connected,” as the budget refers to those who are targeted for explicit tax increases.

Rather than cut taxes for 95 percent of Americans, as the President promised, the budget includes a number of tax increases that would directly and indirectly hit lower and middle income wage earners, as well as the so-called wealthy.  These increases would come in the form of a huge new tax on America's industrial output and energy, which would be passed on to every consumer.  And, they would have the effect of an all-out assault on America's job creation ability and our global competiveness.

I plan to introduce legislation that would install a cap of 20 percent of GDP on all future spending, which is about the historical average.  Lower spending should lead to lower taxes and I am convinced a hard cap on spending may be the only answer that Washington politicians understand.  We need to instill fiscal constraints to ensure a responsible budget.

Washington should do what millions of other Americans are doing to weather the financial storm – find ways to cut and make do with less.  By cutting wasteful spending, eliminating ineffective government programs, and dealing with our long-term entitlement crisis, we can put our fiscal house in order without raising taxes.