Earlier this week, I signed on to co-sponsor the Photo Identification Security Act (H.R. 1314), legislation offered by my good friend, Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnBiden officials pledge to confront cybersecurity challenges head-on Biden's misinformation crackdown spotlights partisan divide on content reform White House looks to cool battle with Facebook MORE (R-Tenn.).

In my opinion, and the opinion of many, this legislation is basic, common-sense. H.R. 1314 requires both the federal government and banks to accept secure forms of identification, and would prevent the latter from issuing credit cards to undocumented, illegal immigrants.

I have no problem with banks opening accounts, providing home loans, or issuing credit cards to legal immigrants to the United States. The access to our banking system is a necessary step to documented residents and workers to realize their own American Dream. However, extending the same products to illegal immigrants sends a mixed message that I can not support.

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On the one hand, we want immigrants to the United States to honor our laws and our immigration policy. Many have taken years to obtain the proper documentation, due to the backlog of the system. On the other hand, our banks - which we in Congress regulate - are in the position of advocating a complete disregard of our laws by tacitly encouraging illegal immigrants through their policy of granting them access to accounts without so much as a valid identification.

The acceptance of Matricula Consular cards issued by the Mexican Government presents a risk to our financial system as well as our national security. The only thing a Mexican citizen wanting to obtain a card is required to present to a consular office is a birth certificate - which are free to be purchased from willing sellers.

This presents a danger to our financial system as it would allow individuals to open multiple accounts, under different names with no consequences. Additionally, non-Mexicans could purchase a birth certificate, obtain a consular card, and open an account - granting them access to send and receive wire transfers from all over the world.

This is something I can not support. Immigrants who a in the United States legally already have the proper documentation to exist in our financial system. There is no good reason for banks to grant access based on unsecured documents, except to generate revenue by exploiting illegal immigrants living in the United States.