James Comey’s history of misconduct 
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Former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThe road not taken: Another FBI failure involving the Clintons surfaces Sarah Huckabee Sanders becomes Fox News contributor 3 real problems Republicans need to address to win in 2020 MORE was fired last May after it became clear he was unfit to lead the department. The end of his tenure was marked by missteps and the shameless politicization of our nation’s leading federal law enforcement agency.

Nearly a year later, Comey is releasing a memoir about his time as the head of the FBI – but it is shaping up to be nothing more than bitter partisan storytelling.

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Comey’s history of misconduct at the FBI has hurt the agency’s reputation and sparked criticism about his credibility from members of both parties. Many lawmakers have pointed to Comey’s contradictory statements and violation of federal protocol as indication that he was unfit to lead the agency.

For instance, Comey broke FBI protocol by publicly speaking about ongoing agency investigations. In July 2016, he said the FBI was closing its investigation into Clinton’s emails. The Justice Department was not involved in this decision because unverified documents claimed they had an agreement with the Clinton campaign. Then, right before the 2016 presidential election, Comey announced he was investigating a new batch of Clinton emails, to the surprise of then-Attorney General Loretta Lynch.

The announcement caused an uproar among Democrats, who came out in full force against Comey. House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi asks Democrats for 'leverage' on impeachment Is there internet life after thirty? Pelosi says Dems 'have to be ready to throw a punch — for the children' in 2020 MORE (D-Calif.) said he was “not in the right job,” while Senate Minority Leader Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJewish Democratic congresswoman and veteran blasts Trump's 'disloyalty' comments Schumer says Trump encouraging anti-Semites Saagar Enjeti: Biden's latest blunder; Krystal Ball: Did Schumer blow our chance to beat McConnell? MORE (D-N.Y.) said he did “not have confidence in [Comey] any longer.” Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillEx-CIA chief worries campaigns falling short on cybersecurity Ocasio-Cortez blasts NYT editor for suggesting Tlaib, Omar aren't representative of Midwest Trump nominees meet fiercest opposition from Warren, Sanders, Gillibrand MORE (D-Mo.) said Comey had “damaged the institution of law enforcement,” while Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrailer shows first look at Annette Bening as Dianne Feinstein Trump administration urges Congress to reauthorize NSA surveillance program The Hill's Morning Report - More talk on guns; many questions on Epstein's death MORE (D-Calif.) called his actions “appalling.”

The missteps didn’t end there. Last January, he presented then-President elect Trump unverified information that had been compiled about his alleged ties to Russia, giving it undeserved credibility. The clearly unreliable dossier turned out to be opposition research funded by Clinton and the Democratic National Committee.

Comey’s contradictions became increasingly clear during his investigation into allegations of the Trump campaign’s collusion with Russia – allegations that are still completely unsubstantial after multiple investigations spanning more than a year.  Last spring, Comey testified before Congress that the FBI was never instructed to stop any investigation for political reasons. At the time, he also claimed he had never leaked information about the ongoing Trump or Clinton investigations, and gave inaccurate information about the emails found on Clinton’s server.

One month later, he testified that President TrumpDonald John TrumpDavid Axelrod after Ginsburg cancer treatment: Supreme Court vacancy could 'tear this country apart' EU says it will 'respond in kind' if US slaps tariffs on France Ginsburg again leaves Supreme Court with an uncertain future MORE had suggested he stop investigating former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn, and that he had helped a friend leak his memos to the press with the hope of initiating a special counsel investigation. These statements went against his original testimony, raising questions about his credibility.

Over the past year, Comey not only undermined the important work being done by the FBI, he also put Democrats’ hypocrisy in full view. The same Democrats who once highlighted Comey’s lack of credibility came to embrace him as soon as he began attacking President Trump. 

As Comey prepares for his upcoming book tour, Americans know that his attempts to smear President Trump and the administration are nothing more than a disgraced former official working in the pursuit of retaliation instead of justice.

Rep. Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarConservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question MORE represents Arizona’s 4th District and is a member of the House Freedom Caucus.