The collusion delusion is over. 

Congressional Democrats spent the last two years fear-mongering on the pretense that President TrumpDonald John TrumpPapadopoulos on AG's new powers: 'Trump is now on the offense' Pelosi uses Trump to her advantage Mike Pence delivers West Point commencement address MORE conspired with the Russians to rig the 2016 presidential election. They promised evidence of collusion. They boasted that Republicans would look “really stupid” once Mueller’s investigation ended.

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After 22 months and more than $25 million in taxpayer funds, we now know what many of us suspected all along: There was no collusion, coordination, or cooperation between President Trump’s campaign and Russia. More than 2,800 subpoenas prove it. Nearly 500 search warrants confirm it. Approximately 500 witnesses, 40 FBI agents and 19 lawyers corroborate it.  

Let’s not forget how all of this started. The Clinton campaign hired the Perkins Coie law firm, which hired Glenn Simpson and Fusion GPS, who hired a foreigner, Christopher Steele, who put together the fake dossier the FBI used to get a warrant to spy on the Trump campaign. Despite their massive, lengthy and costly effort, there was no evidence of collusion. President Trump has been vindicated.

Two things should happen.

First, the non-stop investigations of the president need to end. Unfortunately, it appears this will not happen. When news broke of the attorney general’s letter, House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersTrump appeals order siding with House Democrats bank subpoenas Republicans spend more than million at Trump properties Exclusive: Carson seeks to clean up testimony on protections for homeless transgender people MORE (D-Calif.) took to MSNBC and proclaimed that “this is not the end of anything.” House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump declassification move unnerves Democrats Trump appeals order siding with House Democrats bank subpoenas MORE (D-Calif.) argued there was still “significant evidence of collusion.”  And Democratic presidential candidate and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (Texas) accused President Trump of “attempted collusion.” Give us a break.

Also, do not forget, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDemocrats are running out of stunts to pull from impeachment playbook Trump asks if Nadler will look into Clinton's 'deleted and acid washed' emails Trump tweets conservative commentator's criticism of FBI director MORE (D-N.Y.) already sent 81 document requests to individuals and groups associated with the president. 

Democrats plan to “reset” their strategy to take down the president. They will go after his tax returns, his family and his friends. And it appears they will continue attacking the administration all the way to the 2020 election.

Second, the top FBI officials who ran the Clinton investigation and the Trump-Russia investigation need to be held accountable — James ComeyJames Brien ComeyFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump orders intel agencies to cooperate with Barr probe into 'spying' on 2016 campaign Attorney General Barr puts former intel bosses on notice MORE, Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump accuses Hillary Clinton of 'destroying the lives' of his campaign staffers The Mueller report concludes it was not needed MORE, Jim Baker, Lisa Page, and Peter Strzok. All five have been fired, demoted or resigned and left the FBI. Let’s remember, the last time Strzok testified, he said he couldn’t answer questions because of “ongoing investigative matters.” Well, the Mueller investigation is over, so there shouldn’t be a problem answering any questions. 

While Nadler sent his 81 requests, he didn’t send letters to the two most important people: Christopher Steele, the guy who wrote the bogus dossier, and Glenn Simpson, the guy whose opposition research firm the Clinton campaign hired to put the dossier together. We should see all the conversations between former Justice Department official Bruce Ohr, Simpson and Steele. We should see all the conversations between Simpson and Ohr’s wife, Nellie, who worked for Fusion GPS. And we should know about the conversations between Simpson and Schiff when they secretly met last year in Aspen, Colo. 

If Democrats want transparency, then let’s be transparent. Release the Carter Page FISA application. Release the Bruce Ohr 302s. Release all the information that the investigators gave the “Gang of Eight.” If Democrats want the truth, let’s get the whole truth.

Under President Trump’s leadership, we’ve reduced taxes and cut regulations. The economy is growing at an unbelievable rate with the lowest unemployment in 50 years. Justices Neil Gorsuch and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughMurkowski celebrates birthday with electric scooter ride Graham urges Trump not to abandon infrastructure talks with Democrats 2020 Dems break political taboos by endorsing litmus tests MORE are on the Supreme Court. We’re out of the Iran Deal, the U.S. embassy has been moved to Jerusalem, hostages are home from North Korea, and there’s a new US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement coming.

Let’s not stop there. Let’s secure our border, fix our broken immigration system, and address the other challenges facing our great nation. Instead of choosing to harass the president in partisan investigations, we hope the Democrats will choose to work with us to continue to make America great. 

Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanConservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill Republicans spend more than million at Trump properties GOP lawmakers lay out border security proposals for DHS MORE represents Ohio's 4th District. He serves as the ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, and is a co-founder of the House Freedom Caucus. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsFive takeaways from Barr's new powers in 'spying' probe Trump declassification move unnerves Democrats Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill MORE represents North Carolina’s 11th District. He serves as chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, and as ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s Subcommittee on Government Operations. Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceGOP lawmakers lay out border security proposals for DHS DHS official: Florida one of the 'best' states on election security, despite 2016 Russian hack Overnight Energy — Presented by Job Creators Network — House Republican tries to force Green New Deal vote | 'Awkward' hearing to vet Interior nominee and watchdog | House panel approves bill to stop drilling in Arctic refuge MORE represents Georgia’s 10th District. He serves as ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s Subcommittee on National Security, and as Communication Chair for the House Freedom Caucus. Michael Cloud Represents Texas’s 27th District in the U.S. House of Representatives. He serves as ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s Subcommittee on Economic and Consumer Policy. James Comer Represents Kentucky’s 1st District. He serves as ranking member on the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s Subcommittee on the Environment. Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyOn The Money: Conservative blocks disaster relief bill | Trade high on agenda as Trump heads to Japan | Boeing reportedly faces SEC probe over 737 Max | Study finds CEO pay rising twice as fast as worker pay The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump orders more troops to Mideast amid Iran tensions Conservative blocks House passage of disaster relief bill MORE represents Texas's 21st District and is a member of the Committee on Oversight and Reform.