Fairness for High Skilled Immigrants Act exposes Silicon Valley's hollow diversity slogans
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Silicon Valley says it loves diversity, but the industry only wants workers from one country — and it’s not America.

An estimated 71 percent of the workforce in Silicon Valley is foreign-born. The majority are Indian nationals; nearly 70 percent of those who come on H-1B visas — a favorite of Big Tech — hail from India. Additionally, many tech firms have a sizable presence in India itself.

And the reason tech giants love Indian-born workers? They tend to work for far less than American workers.

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Unfortunately, Congress wants to advance Silicon Valley’s lack of diversity. The Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act would eliminate country caps on immigration and allow Indians to monopolize the share of green cards. It’s estimated that Indians would take at least 75 percent of all employment-based visas if the bill passes. 

The bill’s supporters, including Utah Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeEconomy adds just 235K jobs in August as delta hammers growth Lawmakers flooded with calls for help on Afghanistan exit Afghanistan fiasco proves we didn't leave soon enough MOREsaid the bill would make our immigration system more fair. But letting one or two nationalities monopolize employment visas is fair to no one.

Fortunately, the bill was blocked last week by Kentucky Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate lawmakers let frustration show with Blinken Rand Paul: 'Hatred for Trump' blocking research into ivermectin as COVID-19 treatment Masks and vaccines: What price freedom? MORE when Lee tried to force a vote with no debate or hearings. But there’s a huge danger it will be resurrected. 

This bill is great for Silicon Valley, but bad for high-skilled American workers. As OpenSecrets reported, “a significant portion of the lobbying done in favor of” the bill “was bankrolled by tech companies.” With this act, foreign-born workers would make up an even greater share of the tech workforce, for haf the pay, and Americans with STEM degrees would get the short end of the stick.

Big Tech frames their support for the bill as opposition to discrimination. 

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“Eliminating the discriminatory per-country caps is a crucial first step to keeping highly skilled individuals contributing here instead of taking their talents to our global competitors, while also providing relief for them and their families,” a major Silicon Valley funded lobbying group said in support of the bill.

The real discrimination comes from Silicon Valley’s hiring, not America’s sensible country caps. Unlike Big Tech’s workforce, the country caps strive for diversity and prevent one nationality from dominating our immigration system. 

Silicon Valley giants frequently preach empty platitudes about the value of diversity for employees and customers. However, seeking primarily foreign-born Indian tech workers is not diverse. A truly diverse workforce would be one made up of American citizens from many different backgrounds. Silicon Valley's workforce does not promote America’s best interests, and exposes the hypocrisy of its platitudes.

Congress should encourage Big Tech to change its ways. We should insist these companies hire Americans before recruiting cheap labor from one part of the world. What’s the point in an American getting a STEM degree if our tech corporations won’t hire Americans?

Virgil Goode represented Virginia's 5th Congressional District from 1997 to 2009. He was the first former member of Congress to endorse Donald TrumpDonald TrumpOvernight Defense & National Security — The Pentagon's deadly mistake Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by Climate Power — Interior returns BLM HQ to Washington France pulls ambassadors to US, Australia in protest of submarine deal MORE for president. Follow him on Twitter @VirgilGoode.