Sen. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleySenate committee advances budget reform plan Harris proposes keeping schools open for 10 hours a day Overnight Energy: Dems ask Trump UN ambassador to recuse from Paris climate dealings | Green group sues agencies for records on climate science | Dem wants answers on Keystone oil spill MORE (D-Ore.) on Tuesday joined a Senate Democratic bill that would amend ObamaCare to let people keep insurance plans that are being canceled under the law.

Merkely and Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinHarris shares video addressing staffers the night Trump was elected: 'This is some s---' Centrist Democrats seize on state election wins to rail against Warren's agenda Senate talks on stalled Violence Against Women Act reauthorization unravel MORE (D-Calif.) both joined the Keeping the Affordable Care Act Promise Act on Tuesday. That makes six Democrats in support of the law, including sponsor Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCongress needs to work to combat the poverty, abuse and neglect issues that children face Dems wrestle over how to vote on ‘Green New Deal’ Lobbying world MORE (D-La.).

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On Wednesday, Landrieu tweeted that Merkely is joining the "growing coalition" supporting her bill in the Senate.

Like Landrieu, Merkley is up for reelection next year, as are Sens. Kay HaganKay Ruthven HaganDemocrats will win back the Senate majority in 2020, all thanks to President Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Better Medicare Alliance - Dems shift strategy on impeachment vote Former North Carolina Sen. Kay Hagan dies at 66 MORE (D-N.C.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorTom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 Cotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation MORE (D-Ark.).

Landrieu's bill was introduced last week in response to the growing realization that millions of Americans will not be able to keep their current health insurance plan under ObamaCare due to new insurance standards in the law. That goes against President Obama's promise that if people like their health plan under the law, they would be able to keep it.

The addition of Merkley and Feinstein puts more pressure on the Obama administration to either find some administrative fix to the law, or accept congressional action.

The House will pass separate legislation on Friday from Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) that would let people keep their plans.