The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Hillicon Valley: US threatens to hold intel from Germany over Huawei | GOP senator targets FTC over privacy | Bipartisan bill would beef up 'internet of things' security | Privacy groups seize on suspended NSA program | Tesla makes U-turn Shuttering of NSA surveillance program emboldens privacy groups MORE (R-Wis.), would extend these practices until Dec. 8. The authority to conduct these surveillance activities expires at the end of the month, which explains the haste in the HouseĀ 

House passage will set up a quandary for the Senate, which is considering three bills that would extend the Patriot Act authorities for three years or more.

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinGOP lawmaker offers constitutional amendment capping Supreme Court seats at 9 Overnight Energy: Judge halts drilling on Wyoming public lands over climate change | Dems demand details on Interior's offshore drilling plans | Trump mocks wind power Dem senators demand offshore drilling info before Bernhardt confirmation hearing MORE (D-Calif.) has a bill that would extend them for three years, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahyCitizens lose when partisans play politics with the federal judiciary Senate Dems petition Saudi king to release dissidents, US citizen Patrick Leahy sits at center of partisan judicial nominations MORE (D-Vt.) would extend them for three years and add new oversight language, and ranking Judiciary member Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: Senators seek CBO input on preventing surprise medical bills | Oversight panel seeks OxyContin documents | Pharmacy middlemen to testify on prices | Watchdog warns air ambulances can put patients at 'financial risk' Drug prices are a matter of life and death Senate panel to hear from pharmacy middlemen on drug prices MORE (R-Iowa) has proposed a permanent extension.

A Senate aide said Friday that it is unclear what the Senate would do with the House bill, but said it is conceivable that Feinstein's bill might take the lead in the Senate, because it has support from the Obama administration.