But the Senate is known to be split on how to proceed with a longer extension. Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSchiff should consider using RICO framework to organize impeachment We need answers to questions mainstream media won't ask about Democrats The Hill's Morning Report - Trump grapples with Syria fallout MORE (D-Calif.) earlier this year proposed a straight extension, which the Obama administration supports. And Judiciary Committee ranking member Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyFarmers: New Trump ethanol proposal reneged on previous deal Overnight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate Positive quotes from Iowa senators disappear from EPA's latest ethanol announcement MORE (R-Iowa) prefers a permanent extension.

While Senate Democrats seem eager to move a longer Patriot Act extension, the House might take a slower road. House Democrats hotly opposed any extension until thorough hearings are held, and Republicans promised to hold hearings during the three-month extension.

The surveillance authorities expire Feb. 28, and the extension approved by the House and Senate would extend that until May 27.

As of Friday morning, President Obama had not signed the extension, but is expected to, possibly over the weekend.