In the debate leading up to this procedural vote, Democrats derided Republicans for attempting to "deem" that House-approved budget cuts in H.R. 1 would become law if the Senate fails to act. Several Democrats said this is blatantly unconstitutional.

"Republican's partisan extremism reached a new low this week, with their willingness to ignore some of the most basic fundamentals of our Constitution," said Rep. G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldNorth Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps Black leaders say African American support in presidential primary is fluid North Carolina ruling could cost GOP House seats MORE (D-N.C.). "I am outraged that Republicans could believe that their job-killing budget could become law with just the approval of the House of Representatives. Every American should be offended by such an extreme, reckless and clearly unconstitutional scheme."

Some, like Rep. Paul Tonko (D-N.Y.), said Republican plans are appropriate given that it is April Fool's Day. "They're ignoring our founding document, mocking its principles, and attempting to circumvent 222 years of history," he said, adding that Republicans are hoping that H.R. 1 can "just become law, like magic."

Rep. Rob WoodallWilliam (Rob) Robert WoodallHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad The House Republicans and Democrats not seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (R-Ga.) defended the measure and said it is designed to put pressure on the White House and Congress to negotiate a spending agreement. "It gives the Senate an opportunity to come out from under its paralyzing inaction and pass H.R. 1, and it says that if the Senate does not, if the Senate fails to act … that Congress will not get paid," Woodall said.

But Senate Republicans have acknowledged that the bill is essentially posturing, because House passage of a bill declaring that H.R. 1 is now law means nothing without Senate approval. Sen. Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Amazon to challenge Pentagon cloud contract in court | State antitrust investigation into Google expands | Intel agencies no longer collecting location data without warrant Intelligence agencies have stopped collecting cellphone data without warrants: letter This week: Democrats churn toward next phase of impeachment fight MORE (R-Ind.) said without a broad agreement between the White House and Congress, "we're just whistling in the wind," and Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderPelosi aide hopeful White House will support drug-pricing bill despite criticism Overnight Energy: BLM staff face choice of relocation or resignation as agency moves | Trump says he's 'very much into climate' | EPA rule would expand limits on scientific studies Juan Williams: Republicans flee Trump MORE (R-Tenn.) said no budget would become law without Senate approval.