The two Democrats who voted for President Obama’s budget on Wednesday said they wanted to show support for the administration's policy priorities.

Democratic leaders whipped against Obama’s budget, which was destined for defeat in the GOP-held House, because they didn’t want to make public any divisions over the president’s priorities.

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Every member present ended up voting against the Obama budget except for Reps. Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranStates are stepping up to end animal testing in cosmetics while federal legislation stalls Lawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Dems face close polls in must-win Virginia MORE of Virginia and Marcy Kaptur of Ohio.

“Even though it was structured as a political ploy, it presents a far better blueprint for America’s future than the Ryan budget,” said Moran, referring to the GOP blueprint written by Budget Committee Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanElection Countdown: Cruz, O'Rourke fight at pivotal point | Ryan hitting the trail for vulnerable Republicans | Poll shows Biden leading Dem 2020 field | Arizona Senate debate tonight Paul Ryan to campaign for 25 vulnerable House Republicans GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE (R-Wis.).

Moran is set to retire at the end of this session.

Kaptur said she supported all of the Democratic budget alternatives to Ryan’s budget, including the Congressional Progressive Caucus and Congressional Black Caucus blueprints.

“I supported all Democratic alternatives offered as well,” Kaptur said. “The range of Democratic alternatives, along with the Ryan budget, provide us with the broad parameters for arriving at responsible budgeting.”

Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.) offered the measure mirroring Obama's $3.1 trillion fiscal 2015 proposal. It was rejected in a 2-413 vote. 

Democratic leaders called the Mulvaney amendment a “political stunt.”

More Democrats voted for the Obama budget this year than in 2012, when it was rejected 0-414.