Seven Democrats broke ranks and voted with Republicans to establish a select committee to investigate the 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic annex in Benghazi, Libya.

Reps. Ron BarberRonald (Ron) Sylvester BarberKavanaugh nomination a make or break moment to repeal Citizens United Latina Leaders to Watch 2018 Principles and actions mean more than Jeff Flake’s words MORE (Ariz.), John BarrowJohn Jenkins BarrowThe most important runoff election is one you probably never heard of Our democracy can’t afford to cut legal aid services from the budget Dem files Ethics complaint on Benghazi panel MORE (Ga.), Mike McIntyreDouglas (Mike) Carmichael McIntyreGOP picks up retiring McIntyre's seat in NC Seven Dems vote to create Benghazi panel Lawmakers prep for big race on Sunday MORE (N.C.), Patrick MurphyPatrick Erin MurphyEx-Dem lawmaker: My vote in Florida wasn’t counted due to signature issues Voters are not thinking about consumer confidence at the polls, says pollster Republicans saying they should run on economy aren't talking to real voters, says pollster MORE (Fla.), Collin PetersonCollin Clark PetersonHow America’s urban-rural divide is changing the Democratic Party Anti-abortion rights Dem candidates dwindle as party shifts left Congress allows farm bill to lapse before reauthorization deadline MORE (Minn.), Nick RahallNick Joe RahallWe shouldn't allow politics to impede disaster relief Break the cycle of partisanship with infant, child health care programs Clinton mulls role in 2018 midterms MORE (W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (Ariz.) all voted for the resolution. Six of them face tough reelection races this year.

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McIntyre, who frequently crosses party lines on crucial votes, is retiring.

Meanwhile, Barber, Barrow, Murphy, Peterson and Rahall represent districts that voted for Mitt Romney for president in 2012.

All except Sinema also voted to hold former IRS official Lois Lerner in contempt of Congress on Wednesday.

Sinema said after the vote Thursday that the committee was "a good idea."

"I'm deeply saddened by these tragic events and believe the American people deserve to know what happened on that fateful day," she said. "People in my district and across the country demand answers, and this committee will help provide an explanation of what took place." 

Sinema represents a swing district but is considered less vulnerable than the other Democrats who voted for the Benghazi panel.

After the vote, the National Republican Campaign Committee offered a preview of attacks against Democrats who voted against creating the Benghazi panel.

"It’s been almost two years since the terrorist attack and because of [Democrats and their] allies in the Obama administration, we are no closer to finding answers," NRCC Communications Director Andrea Bozek said in a statement.

— Russell Berman contributed.