The House Democratic leadership split in support for a measure that would give the Veterans Affairs Secretary authority to fire senior executives.

Anything apart from near unison is rare for House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHow to stand out in the crowd: Kirsten Gillibrand needs to find her niche Omar controversies shadow Dems at AIPAC Five things to watch as AIPAC conference kicks off MORE (D-Calif.) and her top lieutenants. 

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Pelosi voted for the bill, which passed 390-33. But House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerOmar controversies shadow Dems at AIPAC Overnight Defense: Top Marine warns border deployment could hurt readiness | McSally aims for sexual assault reforms in defense bill | House to vote on measure opposing transgender ban | New warning over F-35 sale to Turkey House Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts MORE (D-Md.), House Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraCalifornia Assembly Speaker pens fiery response to Pence Dems prepare next steps after Trump's veto Uber to pay million to settle fight over driver benefits, pay MORE (D-Calif.) and House Assistant Minority Leader Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnDemocrats hurting themselves with handling of Ilhan Omar controversy Biden speaking to Dems on Capitol Hill as 2020 speculation mounts: report Former FCC Dem to advise T-Mobile, Sprint on merger MORE (D-S.C.), all voted in opposition. All 33 votes against the measure came from Democrats.

Plus, Reps. George MillerGeorge MillerPelosi names new chief of staff Dem duo poses test for Trump, GOP Lawmakers honor retiring Calif. Reps. Waxman, Miller MORE (D-Calif.), Henry WaxmanHenry Arnold WaxmanA(nother) chance for Congress on net neutrality Feehery: Lessons learned from John Dingell Former Rep. John Dingell dies at 92 MORE (D-Calif.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOvernight Defense: Trump to reverse North Korea sanctions imposed by Treasury | Move sparks confusion | White House says all ISIS territory in Syria retaken | US-backed forces report heavy fighting | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan The Hill's 12:30 Report: Manafort sentenced to total of 7.5 years in prison Hillicon Valley: Google takes heat at privacy hearing | 2020 Dems to debate 'monopoly power' | GOP rips net neutrality bill | Warren throws down gauntlet over big tech | New scrutiny for Trump over AT&T merger MORE (D-Md.), who are all Pelosi confidants, voted against it.

Hoyer, who represents thousands of federal workers, said the measure would potentially undermine the civil service system.

"If the allegations are true, heads ought to roll. That's not what this legislation is about," Hoyer said. "This legislation is about a knee-jerk reaction to a broad situation.

"I cannot support this bill as written,” Hoyer continued. “I believe it opens the door to undoing the careful civil service protections that have been in place for decades.”

Rep. Michael Michaud (D-Maine), the top Democrat on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, is a candidate for governor. During floor debate, he agreed with some of the other Democrats' concerns but said the bill should still move on to the Senate.

"This bill does not address the problem systematically within the VA," Michaud said. But, he added "we must move forward to deal with this issue."

No Republicans voted against the bill.