The House Democratic leadership split in support for a measure that would give the Veterans Affairs Secretary authority to fire senior executives.

Anything apart from near unison is rare for House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report — After contentious week, Trump heads for Japan Frustration boils over with Senate's 'legislative graveyard' Trump-Pelosi fight threatens drug pricing talks MORE (D-Calif.) and her top lieutenants. 

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Pelosi voted for the bill, which passed 390-33. But House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerSteyer plans impeachment push targeting Democrats over recess The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi remains firm despite new impeachment push Pelosi faces tipping point on Trump impeachment MORE (D-Md.), House Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraOvernight Energy: Trump moves forward with rule on California drilling | House panel advances bill that resumes participation in Paris climate fund | Perry pressed on 'environmental justice' | 2020 Dem proposes climate corps Trump administration moves forward with final rule to allow new California drilling Overnight Energy: Interior chief says climate response falls on Congress | Bernhardt insists officials will complete offshore drilling plans | Judge rules EPA must enforce Obama landfill pollution rules MORE (D-Calif.) and House Assistant Minority Leader Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnDems want climate change, tax hikes in infrastructure deal New Mexico Dems brace for crowded race to succeed Udall Democrats hurting themselves with handling of Ilhan Omar controversy MORE (D-S.C.), all voted in opposition. All 33 votes against the measure came from Democrats.

Plus, Reps. George MillerGeorge MillerPelosi names new chief of staff Dem duo poses test for Trump, GOP Lawmakers honor retiring Calif. Reps. Waxman, Miller MORE (D-Calif.), Henry WaxmanHenry Arnold WaxmanCurrent, former lawmakers celebrate release of new book on Jack Brooks, 'The Meanest Man in Congress' Finally, a presidential EMP order that may save American lives A(nother) chance for Congress on net neutrality MORE (D-Calif.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenPhoto showing 3-year-old girl high-five new Harriet Tubman mural goes viral The Hill's Morning Report - Trump says no legislation until Dems end probes Democrats grill Trump Interior chief for saying he hasn't 'lost sleep' over climate change MORE (D-Md.), who are all Pelosi confidants, voted against it.

Hoyer, who represents thousands of federal workers, said the measure would potentially undermine the civil service system.

"If the allegations are true, heads ought to roll. That's not what this legislation is about," Hoyer said. "This legislation is about a knee-jerk reaction to a broad situation.

"I cannot support this bill as written,” Hoyer continued. “I believe it opens the door to undoing the careful civil service protections that have been in place for decades.”

Rep. Michael Michaud (D-Maine), the top Democrat on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, is a candidate for governor. During floor debate, he agreed with some of the other Democrats' concerns but said the bill should still move on to the Senate.

"This bill does not address the problem systematically within the VA," Michaud said. But, he added "we must move forward to deal with this issue."

No Republicans voted against the bill.