The House Democratic leadership split in support for a measure that would give the Veterans Affairs Secretary authority to fire senior executives.

Anything apart from near unison is rare for House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMcConnell focuses on confirming judicial nominees with COVID-19 talks stalled Overnight Defense: Top admiral says 'no condition' where US should conduct nuclear test 'at this time' | Intelligence chief says Congress will get some in-person election security briefings Pelosi must go — the House is in dire need of new leadership MORE (D-Calif.) and her top lieutenants. 

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Pelosi voted for the bill, which passed 390-33. But House Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse Democrats postpone vote on marijuana decriminalization bill Democrats scramble on COVID-19 relief amid division, Trump surprise The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (D-Md.), House Democratic Caucus Chairman Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump casts doubt on climate change science during briefing on wildfires | Biden attacks Trump's climate record amid Western wildfires, lays out his plan | 20 states sue EPA over methane emissions standards rollback 20 states sue EPA over methane emissions standards rollback Investigation underway after bags of mail found dumped in Los Angeles-area parking lot MORE (D-Calif.) and House Assistant Minority Leader Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnAzar to testify before House coronavirus subcommittee Attacks against the police are organized and violent Clark rolls out endorsements in assistant Speaker race MORE (D-S.C.), all voted in opposition. All 33 votes against the measure came from Democrats.

Plus, Reps. George MillerGeorge MillerMellman: Debating Michael Bloomberg To support today's students, Congress must strengthen oversight of colleges Pelosi names new chief of staff MORE (D-Calif.), Henry WaxmanHenry Arnold WaxmanLobbying groups received millions in PPP loans The Hill's Top Lobbyists 2019 Lawmakers come together to honor Cummings: 'One of the greats in our country's history' MORE (D-Calif.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenMid-Atlantic states sue EPA over Chesapeake Bay pollution Trump payroll-tax deferral for federal workers sparks backlash Senators urge administration to make payroll tax deferral optional for federal workers MORE (D-Md.), who are all Pelosi confidants, voted against it.

Hoyer, who represents thousands of federal workers, said the measure would potentially undermine the civil service system.

"If the allegations are true, heads ought to roll. That's not what this legislation is about," Hoyer said. "This legislation is about a knee-jerk reaction to a broad situation.

"I cannot support this bill as written,” Hoyer continued. “I believe it opens the door to undoing the careful civil service protections that have been in place for decades.”

Rep. Michael Michaud (D-Maine), the top Democrat on the House Veterans Affairs Committee, is a candidate for governor. During floor debate, he agreed with some of the other Democrats' concerns but said the bill should still move on to the Senate.

"This bill does not address the problem systematically within the VA," Michaud said. But, he added "we must move forward to deal with this issue."

No Republicans voted against the bill.