The House early Friday passed the third 2015 appropriations bill that would fund the Departments of Commerce and Justice, as well as federal science programs.

Passed in a 321-87 vote, the bill would provide $51.2 billion in funding through September 2015, a reduction of nearly $400 million below the current spending level. 

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The legislation was considered under an open rule, which allowed members to offer an unlimited number of amendments. In total, the House considered more than 80 amendments over the course of two days.

Those amendments included increasing funding for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System by $19.5 million in response to the mass shooting last week in Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Immigration entered the fray during debate of the wide-ranging measure. Late Wednesday, the House gave voice vote approval to an amendment from Rep. Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreOn The Money: Senate panel scraps vote on key spending bill amid standoff | Democrats threaten to vote against defense bill over wall funding | Trump set to meet with aides about reducing capital gains taxes House Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment House Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid MORE (D-Wis.) that would boost funding for the Justice Department's Executive Office of Immigration Review, which handles immigration court proceedings. 

Earlier Thursday, the House adopted, 218-193, an amendment offered by Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingOcasio-Cortez rips Steve King after he shares video drinking from toilet-fountain hybrid at border Steve King says he drank from toilet at detention center Steve King jokes about China forcing Muslims to eat pork MORE (R-Iowa) that would provide $5 million for the Justice Department to investigate the Obama administration's release of illegal immigrants facing deportation who are also criminals. King said the current policy amounted to "de facto amnesty." 

Consideration of the measure further included heated debates over drug policy. Shortly before final passage, the House adopted 219-189 an amendment from Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz Former GOP Rep. Rohrabacher joins board of cannabis company MORE (R-Calif.) that would prohibit the Justice Department from allowing states to implement their own medical marijuana laws. And earlier Thursday evening, the House rejected an amendment from Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), whose state has legalized marijuana, that would cut funding to the Drug Enforcement Administration by $35 million. About $2 billion is allocated for the DEA in the legislation. 

The controversy over the Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals' mishandling of wait times for medical care also made its way into the Commerce-Justice-Science bill. At nearly midnight Wednesday, the House gave voice vote approval to an amendment offered by Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanBottom Line Koch political arm endorses Colorado Sen. Gardner 20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform MORE (R-Colo.) that would provide the Justice Department $1 million to conduct a criminal investigation into the VA. 

The legislation includes provisions that prohibit the use of funds for transferring detainees at the Guantánamo Bay facility to the United States. Rep. Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranStar-studded cast to perform play based on Mueller report DC theatre to host 11-hour reading of the Mueller report Bottom line MORE's (D-Va.) amendment to strike that part of the bill was rebuffed, 169-230. 

The legislation would also provide $17.9 billion for NASA, which is $250 million above the current spending level. Additionally, it includes $7.4 billion for the National Science Foundation, which is $232 million more than the 2014 level.

Rep. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfDOJ opinion will help protect kids from dangers of online gambling Vulnerable Republican keeps focus as Democrats highlight Trump Bolton could be the first national security chief to prioritize religious freedom MORE (R-Va.), the retiring chairman of the House Appropriations Commerce-Justice-Science subcommittee, warned that the increased science funding should only be used for "scientifically meritorious" research grants.

"With increased funding comes increased responsibility," Wolf said. "No funny grants is what I'm trying to say."

The House passed the 2015 military construction-Veterans Affairs and legislative branch appropriations bills - considered the least controversial of the 12 annual appropriations measures - earlier this month. Passing all 12 of them before the end of September, the end of the current fiscal year, will be tough, especially in an election year. 

But House Appropriations  Committee Chairman Hal RogersHarold (Hal) Dallas RogersTrump says he'll decide on foreign aid cuts within a week Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid Appropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid MORE (R-Ky.) nonetheless said his panel would try to pass as many of the individual appropriations bills as possible.

"We're moving at a very fast clip on the committee that should allow us to complete our appropriations work for the 2015 fiscal year on time. And I promise my committee will do everything it can to make that a reality," Rogers said.

The Senate, meanwhile, has yet to pass any 2015 appropriations bills.