The House early Friday passed the third 2015 appropriations bill that would fund the Departments of Commerce and Justice, as well as federal science programs.

Passed in a 321-87 vote, the bill would provide $51.2 billion in funding through September 2015, a reduction of nearly $400 million below the current spending level. 

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The legislation was considered under an open rule, which allowed members to offer an unlimited number of amendments. In total, the House considered more than 80 amendments over the course of two days.

Those amendments included increasing funding for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System by $19.5 million in response to the mass shooting last week in Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Immigration entered the fray during debate of the wide-ranging measure. Late Wednesday, the House gave voice vote approval to an amendment from Rep. Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreHouse lawmakers introduce bill to end US support in Yemen civil war Ironworker and star of viral video wins Dem primary for Paul Ryan's seat On The Money: Trump defends tariff moves as allies strike back | China says it's ready for trade war | Maxine Waters is done with 'nice guy' politics | ZTE allowed to resume some operations MORE (D-Wis.) that would boost funding for the Justice Department's Executive Office of Immigration Review, which handles immigration court proceedings. 

Earlier Thursday, the House adopted, 218-193, an amendment offered by Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingJulian Castro responds to Steve King 'Hispanic' comments: 'He does what he usually does' Julián Castro says he’s 'likely' to run in 2020 Steve King: Julian and Joaquin Castro learned Spanish to ‘qualify as retroactive Hispanics’ MORE (R-Iowa) that would provide $5 million for the Justice Department to investigate the Obama administration's release of illegal immigrants facing deportation who are also criminals. King said the current policy amounted to "de facto amnesty." 

Consideration of the measure further included heated debates over drug policy. Shortly before final passage, the House adopted 219-189 an amendment from Rep. Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherMidterms in 2018 become most expensive in history Dems target small cluster of states in battle for House GOP super PAC pushes back on report it skipped ad buys for California's Rohrabacher, Walters MORE (R-Calif.) that would prohibit the Justice Department from allowing states to implement their own medical marijuana laws. And earlier Thursday evening, the House rejected an amendment from Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), whose state has legalized marijuana, that would cut funding to the Drug Enforcement Administration by $35 million. About $2 billion is allocated for the DEA in the legislation. 

The controversy over the Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals' mishandling of wait times for medical care also made its way into the Commerce-Justice-Science bill. At nearly midnight Wednesday, the House gave voice vote approval to an amendment offered by Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanGroup begins 'Nuns on the Bus' tour to protest Trump tax law ahead of midterms Election Countdown: Dems raising millions in fight for House | Trump attacks potential challengers | GOP finalizes 2020 convention plans | Dems see Kavanaugh fight driving women voters to the polls | Bloomberg spending big for Senate Dems GOP sacrifices women and House Republicans with Kavanaugh plan MORE (R-Colo.) that would provide the Justice Department $1 million to conduct a criminal investigation into the VA. 

The legislation includes provisions that prohibit the use of funds for transferring detainees at the Guantánamo Bay facility to the United States. Rep. Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranStates are stepping up to end animal testing in cosmetics while federal legislation stalls Lawmakers, media serve up laughs at annual 'Will on the Hill' Dems face close polls in must-win Virginia MORE's (D-Va.) amendment to strike that part of the bill was rebuffed, 169-230. 

The legislation would also provide $17.9 billion for NASA, which is $250 million above the current spending level. Additionally, it includes $7.4 billion for the National Science Foundation, which is $232 million more than the 2014 level.

Rep. Frank WolfFrank Rudolph WolfVulnerable Republican keeps focus as Democrats highlight Trump Bolton could be the first national security chief to prioritize religious freedom House votes to mandate sexual harassment training for members and staff MORE (R-Va.), the retiring chairman of the House Appropriations Commerce-Justice-Science subcommittee, warned that the increased science funding should only be used for "scientifically meritorious" research grants.

"With increased funding comes increased responsibility," Wolf said. "No funny grants is what I'm trying to say."

The House passed the 2015 military construction-Veterans Affairs and legislative branch appropriations bills - considered the least controversial of the 12 annual appropriations measures - earlier this month. Passing all 12 of them before the end of September, the end of the current fiscal year, will be tough, especially in an election year. 

But House Appropriations  Committee Chairman Hal RogersHarold (Hal) Dallas RogersOn The Money: GOP shrugs off Trump shutdown threat | Trump warns Japan ties could sour over trade | US businesses add 163k workers in August | House GOP huddles on 'tax cut 2.0' GOP shrugs off Trump shutdown threat The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by PhRMA — Tensions mount for House Republicans MORE (R-Ky.) nonetheless said his panel would try to pass as many of the individual appropriations bills as possible.

"We're moving at a very fast clip on the committee that should allow us to complete our appropriations work for the 2015 fiscal year on time. And I promise my committee will do everything it can to make that a reality," Rogers said.

The Senate, meanwhile, has yet to pass any 2015 appropriations bills.