The House on Tuesday passed legislation to impose further sanctions extremist group Hezbollah's foreign assets.

Passed 404-0, the measure would slap sanctions on Hezbollah's foreign assets, international narcotics trafficking rings and its television station, Al-Manar.

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"Today, we have an opportunity to place a critical blow to Hezbollah," said the bill's sponsor, Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsJordan on leadership loss: 'We knew it was an uphill fight' The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Congress returns to leadership races, lame-duck drama House Republicans set to elect similar team of leaders despite midterm thumping MORE (R-N.C.). "We must pass this legislation to make sure that we can do is cripple their ability to finance and put people out of harm's way." 

Specifically, it would direct the Treasury Department to prohibit maintaining a payable-through account in the U.S. by a foreign financial institution that knowingly helps Hezbollah's activities.

In addition, the president would be authorized to designate Hezbollah as a foreign narcotics trafficker and a transnational criminal organization. The U.S. government has designated Hezbollah as a terrorist organization since 1995.

"This legislation we are considering today would give the administration the means necessary to combat Hezbollah's global financial network," said Rep. Brad Schneider (D-Ill.). 

The sanctions could end 30 days after the president certifies to Congress that Hezbollah is no longer a foreign terrorist organization or threat to the U.S. 

Rep. Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Border deployment 'peaked' at 5,800 troops | Trump sanctions 17 Saudis over Khashoggi killing | Senators offer bill to press Trump on Saudis | Paul effort to block Bahrain arms sale fails Trump faces new hurdles on foreign policy Republicans jockey for top GOP spot on House Foreign Affairs Committee MORE (D-N.Y.), the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, argued that crippling sanctions on Hezbollah could help bring the group to the negotiating table. He pointed to the ongoing negotiations with Iran over its nuclear arsenal, arguing that the talks began because of international sanctions.

"This can be done with Hezbollah. This is what we're trying to do today," Engel said.