Five House Republicans defected from their ranks on the Wednesday vote to authorize the party's lawsuit against President Obama.

Reps. Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounJoe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia California lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner MORE (Ga.), Scott GarrettErnest (Scott) Scott GarrettBiz groups take victory lap on Ex-Im Bank Export-Import Bank back to full strength after Senate confirmations Manufacturers support Reed to helm Ex-Im Bank MORE (N.J.), Walter JonesWalter Beaman JonesRepublican Greg Murphy wins special election in NC's 3rd District Early voting extended in NC counties impacted by Dorian ahead of key House race The Hill's Campaign Report: North Carolina special election poses test for GOP ahead of 2020 MORE (N.C.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieO'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Airports already have plenty of infrastructure funding MORE (Ky.) and Steve StockmanStephen (Steve) Ernest StockmanConsequential GOP class of 1994 all but disappears Former aide sentenced for helping ex-congressman in fraud scheme Former congressman sentenced to 10 years in prison for campaign finance scheme MORE (Texas) all voted against the resolution authorizing the GOP lawsuit against the president for his use of executive power.

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Broun, Stockman and Jones have all indicated support for impeaching President Obama. Jones told The Hill he didn't think the lawsuit went far enough.

A Broun spokeswoman said he voted against the bill because he didn't think it would truly help limit President Obama's executive power.

"Dr. Broun believes that this legislation – while well-intentioned – is doomed for death in the Senate. As a result, he would rather see House leadership work towards practical solutions which would shrink the size and scope of government and cut wasteful federal spending when it comes to stopping the president’s gross overreach of executive power," Broun spokeswoman Christine Hardman said.

Spokespeople for Garrett and Massie did not respond to requests for comment.

No Democrats voted for the resolution. A handful of vulnerable Democrats typically break with their party on major issues, such as holding former Internal Revenue Service official Lois Lerner in contempt of Congress. But House Democrats held the party line this time.