More than 20 House members missed the first series of votes on Friday, raising questions about how many people will vote on the GOP's new border bill.

The number of present members will be crucial as GOP leadership continues to whip members behind the border supplemental appropriations package and a separate bill to limit the Deferred Action on Child Arrivals (DACA) program. Votes are expected on the bills later Friday.

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If 21 members are missing from votes later on Friday, it could narrow down the needed majority to pass the border bills. In that case, only 207 aye votes would be needed to pass each bill.

There are currently two vacancies. If all 433 House members were to vote, legislation needs 217 votes to pass.

Reps. Alan Nunnelee (R-Miss.) and Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.) are both ill and have missed votes all week. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-Hawaii) has also been away throughout the week, as she is campaigning ahead of her primary election later this month.

Thirteen Democrats and seven Republicans missed both votes. 

The first vote was on a procedural move known as ordering the previous question. The second was on adoption of a rule to grant same-day authority, which allows the House to consider a rule the same day it is approved by the House Rules Committee. Normally, the House must wait at least one day before voting on a rule, which sets parameters for floor debate. Adoption of the same-day rule essentially speeds up consideration of the legislation regarding the border crisis.

Notably missing was Rep. Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington GOP faces tough battle to become 'party of health care' 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington MORE (R-Va.), who stepped down as House majority leader on Thursday. Cantor also announced late Thursday that he will resign his seat on Aug. 18 so that his successor can serve in the lame-duck session. A spokeswoman did not say if he would return for potential votes later Friday.

Below is a list of the missing members:

7 Republicans:

John Campbell (Calif.)

Eric Cantor (Va.)

Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.)

Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyRising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief Cummings announces expansion of Oversight panel's White House personal email probe, citing stonewalling Pelosi says it's up to GOP to address sexual assault allegation against Trump MORE (S.C.)

Gary Miller (Calif.)

Alan Nunnelee (Miss.)

Aaron Schock (Ill.)

 

14 Democrats:

Lacy Clay (Mo.)

John Dingell (Mich.)

Chaka Fattah (Pa.)

John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiHouse Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Trump bashes Mueller for 'ineptitude,' slams 'sick' Democrats backing impeachment Pelosi denies she's 'trying to run out the clock' on impeachment MORE (Calif.)

Alan GraysonAlan Mark GraysonFlorida's Darren Soto fends off Dem challenge from Alan Grayson Live results: Arizona and Florida hold primaries The Hill's Morning Report: Frustration mounts as Republicans blow up tax message MORE (Fla.)

Gene GreenRaymond (Gene) Eugene GreenTexas New Members 2019 Two Democrats become first Texas Latinas to serve in Congress Latina Leaders to Watch 2018 MORE (Texas)

Colleen Hanabusa (Hawaii)

Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickSwing-seat Democrats oppose impeachment, handing Pelosi leverage McSally gets new primary challenger Two Democrats vow to press forward on Trump impeachment MORE (Ariz.)

Jim McDermottJames (Jim) Adelbert McDermottBottom Line Promoting the voice of Korean Americans Lobbying World MORE (Wash.)

Jim MoranJames (Jim) Patrick MoranStar-studded cast to perform play based on Mueller report DC theatre to host 11-hour reading of the Mueller report Bottom line MORE (Va.)

Jerry Nadler (N.Y.)

Raul Ruiz (Calif.)

Bobby Rush (Ill.)

Jackie Speier (Calif.)