Rep. Stephen LynchStephen Francis LynchFive takeaways from the latest fundraising reports in the lead-up to 2020 5 House Dems likely to attract primary challengers Insurgent Dems amplify push for term limits on party leaders MORE (D-Mass.) has introduced legislation that would offer disabled veterans who serve as federal employees with extra time off to seek medical care.

The measure, which Lynch co-sponsored with Reps. Blake FarentholdRandolph (Blake) Blake FarentholdLawmaker seeks to ban ex-members from lobbying until sexual harassment settlements repaid Former Texas lawmaker Blake Farenthold resigns from lobbying job Congress sends bill overhauling sexual harassment policy to Trump's desk MORE (R-Texas), Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsHouse chairman: Trump lawyers may have given false info about Cohen payments Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by America's 340B Hospitals — Dems blast rulemaking on family planning program | Facebook may remove anti-vaccine content | Medicare proposes coverage for new cancer treatment Rule change sharpens Dem investigations into Trump MORE (D-Md.) and G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldWinners and losers in the border security deal Pelosi runs tight ship as more stormy waters await Lean job market for Dems on K Street MORE (D-N.C.), would offer veterans with 13 days, or 104 hours, of "Wounded Warrior leave" during their first year as federal workers.

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Lynch said his bill would give veterans adequate time to take care of medical needs without resorting to leave without pay.

"Our Wounded Warrior federal employees who are just starting out in the federal workforce are often faced with the difficult choice of having to take unpaid leave to attend their V.A. appointments or miss their medical visits," Lynch said.

Federal workers are eligible for up to 13 days of paid sick leave by their second year of employment. Any unused leave offered by the Lynch bill could not be carried over to the next year.

Cummings said the bill would ensure that injured veterans do not have to compromise their health upon starting in the federal workforce.

"This legislation will help with their transition by providing a bank of leave in their first year of federal employment that they can use for medical treatments while continuing their public service," Cummings said.