Rep. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Juul pitched products to Native American tribes | Vaping execs deny deliberately targeting young people | Republicans seek hearing on Medicaid block grants Overnight Health Care: Big Pharma looks to stem losses after trade deal defeat | House panel to examine federal marijuana policies | House GOP reopens investigation into opioid manufacturers Lawmakers express alarm over rise in cocaine overdose deaths MORE (R-Texas) on Monday suggested that delaying visas for people traveling from countries in West Africa dealing with the Ebola outbreak would help limit its spread to the U.S.

Burgess said that extending the amount of time before approving visas could give medical facilities more time to prepare for treating potential Ebola patients.

ADVERTISEMENT

“At least temporarily, you may need a longer period of time before someone applies for and receives a visa to come to this country from those areas that have been so badly affected — not that you’re going to shut them off, but, you know, you do pause things for a little bit to allow us on our side, this side of the health care spectrum, time to adjust," Burgess said on MSNBC's "Morning Joe."

Burgess, a former obstetrician, said that average hospitals like the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas that treated the Liberian man who died from Ebola last week, may not be fully equipped to deal with Ebola patients. Multiple Americans who contracted Ebola while in West Africa have received treatment at hospitals like Emory University in Atlanta and Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha that have special units for treating highly infectious diseases like Ebola.

"It just begs the question, why should your average community hospital now be required to staff up and run the type of isolation unit that, quite honestly, they spent years preparing for at Emory and in Omaha?" Burgess said.

The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital announced Sunday that a nurse who had been treating the Liberian man who died from Ebola last week had contracted the virus, making the case the first transmission in the U.S.