Twenty-five Republicans rebelled against John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBipartisanship has become a partisan weapon The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez What's a party caucus chair worth? MORE (R-Ohio), who won a third term as Speaker on Tuesday.

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The 25 Republicans, including three freshmen, didn't coalesce around a single alternative candidate.

Rep. Daniel Webster (R-Fla.), whose nomination for Speaker became public just minutes before the vote, attracted the most votes at 12.

Meanwhile, the other two long-shot candidates, Reps. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertDemocrat moves to censure three Republicans for downplaying Jan. 6 Gohmert says Jan. 6 mob attack on Capitol not an 'armed insurrection' Pence to give keynote address at National Conservative Student Conference MORE (R-Texas) and Ted YohoTheodore (Ted) Scott YohoOcasio-Cortez on Taylor Greene: 'These are the kinds of people that I threw out of bars all the time' Ocasio-Cortez: 'No consequences' in GOP for violence, racism 7 surprise moments from a tumultuous year in politics MORE (R-Fla.) only received three and two votes each.

Additionally, freshman Rep. Brian Babin (R-Texas) voted "present" rather than voting for anyone. And two Republican lawmakers voted for people who aren't even members of the House: Rep. Gary Palmer (R-Ala.) for Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsOne quick asylum fix: How Garland can help domestic violence survivors Biden fills immigration court with Trump hires Trump admin got phone records of WaPo reporters covering Russia probe: report MORE (R-Ala.), and Rep. Curt Clawson (R-Fla.) for Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP lawmaker calls for Wuhan probe to 'prevent the next pandemic' All congressional Democrats say they have been vaccinated: CNN Fauci on Rand Paul: 'I just don't understand what the problem is with him' MORE (R-Ky.).

Many of the votes for GOP candidates apart from BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerBipartisanship has become a partisan weapon The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez What's a party caucus chair worth? MORE drew murmurs and sometimes even outright laughter in the House chamber. The votes for Paul and Sessions drew the most derision from fellow lawmakers.

Most of the lawmakers who voted against Boehner are hard-line conservatives who particularly opposed the GOP leadership's handling of the government-wide spending bill last month. Many conservatives had urged leadership to defund President Obama's executive action to shield illegal immigrants from deportation. But the "cromnibus" spending package didn't include such a provision.

Many lawmakers were absent from the vote due to former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo's (D) funeral in New York and snow in Washington, D.C. Rep. Trey GowdyTrey GowdyFox News signs Trey Gowdy, Dan Bongino for new shows Pompeo rebukes Biden's new foreign policy The Hunter Biden problem won't go away MORE (R-S.C.), a favorite for Speaker among some Tea Party supporters, didn't make it in time due to the weather but said he would have voted for Boehner.

On the Democratic side, only four lawmakers voted for candidates aside from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) voted for former Secretary of State Colin Powell, while Rep. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) voted for civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.). And Rep. Gwen Graham (D-Fla.), who stated she wouldn't support Pelosi on the campaign trail, voted for Cooper.

Below is a list of the Republican lawmakers who voted against Boehner:

Justin AmashJustin AmashCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Biden: 'Prince Philip gladly dedicated himself to the people of the UK' Battle rages over vaccine passports MORE (R-Mich.)
Brian Babin (R-Texas)
Rod Blum (R-Iowa)
Dave Brat (R-Va.)
Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineBill Nelson is a born-again supporter of commercial space at NASA Has the Biden administration abandoned the idea of a moon base? Bill Nelson's nomination as NASA administrator is replete with irony MORE (R-Okla.)
Curt Clawson (R-Fla.)
Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.)
Jeff Duncan (R-S.C.)
Scott GarrettErnest (Scott) Scott GarrettOn The Trail: The political losers of 2020 Biz groups take victory lap on Ex-Im Bank Export-Import Bank back to full strength after Senate confirmations MORE (R-N.J.)
Chris Gibson (R-N.Y.)
Louie Gohmert (R-Texas)
Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarRomney: Capitol riot was 'an insurrection against the Constitution' Democrat moves to censure three Republicans for downplaying Jan. 6 Gohmert says Jan. 6 mob attack on Capitol not an 'armed insurrection' MORE (R-Ariz.)
Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.)
Walter Jones (R-N.C.)
Steve King (R-Iowa)
Thomas Massie (R-Ky.)
Mark Meadows (R-N.C.)
Richard Nugent (R-Fla.)
Gary Palmer (R-Ala.)
Bill Posey (R-Fla.)
Scott RigellScott RigellSpanberger's GOP challenger raises over .8 million in third quarter Ex-Rep. Scott Taylor to seek old Virginia seat GOP rushes to embrace Trump MORE (R-Va.)
Marlin Stutzman (R-Ind.)
Randy WeberRandall (Randy) Keith WeberTexas Republicans condemn state Democrats for response to official calling Scott an 'Oreo' House Republicans ask Pelosi to reschedule Biden's address to Congress McCarthy seeks shift from party's civil war MORE (R-Texas)
Daniel Webster (R-Fla.)
Ted Yoho (R-Fla.)