"The idea of illegal immigrants receiving federal benefits like food stamps or Social Security is crazy to most Americans," Akin said. "We welcome legal immigrants who can contribute to these programs and then receive benefits for which they are legally eligible.

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"Unfortunately, the rule of law is under assault by the Obama administration, particularly when it comes to immigration. This has caused numerous states to enact their own state laws to protect their citizens and borders because the federal government has failed to act."

Akin added that federal social programs are already on unsustainable paths to meet obligations to U.S. citizens, and cited press reports saying that adding 5 million illegal couples would cost Social Security $500 billion.

His Validating Entitlement Recipients Through Indicated Federal Immigration Status (VERIFI) Act, H.R. 6000, is co-sponsored by Reps. Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksGOP lawmaker blasts Omar and Tlaib: Netanyahu right to block 'enemies' of Israel Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (R-Ala.), Paul BrounPaul Collins BrounCalifornia lawmaker's chief of staff resigns after indictment Republican candidates run against ghost of John Boehner The Trail 2016: Let’s have another debate! MORE (R-Ga.), Trent FranksHarold (Trent) Trent FranksArizona New Members 2019 Cook shifts 8 House races toward Dems Freedom Caucus members see openings in leadership MORE (R-Ariz.), Phil GingreyJohn (Phil) Phillip Gingrey2017's top health care stories, from ObamaCare to opioids Beating the drum on healthcare Former GOP chairman joins K Street MORE (R-Ga.), Gregg Harper (R-Miss.), Tim Huelskamp (R-Kan.), Walter Jones (R-N.C.), Jack Kingston (R-Ga.), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertBipartisan resolution aims to protect lawmakers amid heightened threats of violence Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (R-Ariz.) and Lynn Westmoreland (R-Ga.).

Also Thursday, Rep. Michael BurgessMichael Clifton BurgessTrump officials propose easing privacy rules to improve addiction treatment House approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (R-Texas) introduced a bill that would prohibit DHS from granting a work authorization to an alien found to have been unlawfully present in the United States. Burgess and other Republicans have criticized the administration's decision not just for what they said is selective enforcement of U.S. immigration law, but for the decision to encourage illegal immigrants under 30 to apply for work authorization in the United States.

The GOP has said that decision pits unemployed U.S. workers against illegal immigrants for jobs.

"With over 12 million Americans unemployed, President Obama showed that he is not concerned with policies that will put them back to work," Burgess said last week. "Instead, he wants to put illegal immigrants ahead of the rule of law and provide them with work permits."

While Republicans have introduced a handful of bills to counter Obama's immigration decision, GOP leaders in the House have so far been mum on whether they will schedule votes on these bills. But Republicans appear split on whether to fight the decision aggressively, or to be more wary of how the issue is playing out politically, and let GOP presidential front-runner Mitt Romney take the lead.

On Thursday, House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington GOP faces tough battle to become 'party of health care' 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington MORE (R-Va.) did not mention any bills related to immigration that the chamber would take up next week, before the July 4 break.

Earlier this week, Rep. Ben Quayle (R-Ariz.) offered a bill that would prohibit DHS from implementing the administration's policy announcement. The announcement took the form of a memo from DHS that said it would exercise discretion on how it would enforce deportation proceedings against illegal immigrants.

Schweikert, who is in a primary runoff against Quayle, introduced a separate bill prohibiting executive orders on immigration from being followed, although the Obama administration's decision did not come in the form of an executive order.