Bill would allow parents to opt out of standardized tests for their kids
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Two House lawmakers have authored legislation to allow parents to opt their children out of standardized tests required by the No Child Left Behind education law.

The bill introduced by Reps. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedRepublicans' rendezvous with reality — their plan is to cut Social Security The Democratic plan for smaller paychecks House passes bill to update tax code to help same-sex married couples MORE (R-N.Y.) and Rosa DeLauroRosa Luisa DeLauroMigrants in US border detention centers won't receive flu vaccine Lawmakers point to entitlements when asked about deficits House bill would make World Cup funds contingent on equal pay MORE (D-Conn.) would extend to tests required through Common Core education standards.

The bipartisan duo said their measure would prevent schools from losing federal funding if parents don't want their kids to take the standardized tests.

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“Our school districts should not be punished because parents exercise this choice," Reed said in a statement.

DeLauro said their proposal would give parents more authority over their children's education.

"Testing can be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying problems and determining how best to help children succeed. But making high-stakes tests rather than learning the centerpiece of the education system, and the one and only indicator of success or failure, is problematic," DeLauro said.

Teachers unions, including the National Education Association and the New York State Teachers Union, have endorsed the bill.

So far the measure has just one other co-sponsor in Rep. Chris Gibson (R-N.Y.).

Common Core has become a flashpoint in the GOP presidential race, with nearly all candidates except former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush pledging to eliminate the standards. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie announced Thursday that he will pull his state out of Common Core.