Bill would prevent discrimination for opposing gay marriage

Two prominent conservatives have introduced legislation to ban federal agencies from discriminating against people who oppose same-sex marriage.

The congressional lawmakers say their measure would protect religious freedom. Under the bill, agencies would be prohibited from denying grants, tax exemptions, certifications or licenses because of a business or individual’s belief that marriage should be limited to heterosexual couples.

Rep. Raúl Labrador (R-Idaho) authored the House version, and Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeCPAC, all-in for Trump, is not what it used to be OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Key vote for Haaland's confirmation | Update on oil and gas leasing | SEC update on climate-related risk disclosure requirements Haaland on drilling lease moratorium: 'It's not going to be a permanent thing' MORE (R-Utah) has submitted a companion measure in the Senate.

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“Our bill ensures that the federal government does not penalize Americans for following their religious beliefs or moral convictions on traditional marriage,” Labrador said in a statement. “In a shifting landscape, it’s time that Congress proactively defend this sacred right.”

The Supreme Court is expected to issue a ruling later this month that could legalize same-sex marriage nationwide. At issue is whether same-sex marriages must be recognized in states where they are not legal.

So far, the legislation has 57 co-sponsors in the House. Rep. Dan Lipinski (Ill.) is the only Democrat to endorse the bill.

The Senate version, meanwhile, has 18 co-sponsors.