Conservative sworn in to replace Boehner
© Greg Nash

Businessman Warren Davidson is now officially a member of the House, filling the vacancy left by former Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbyists race to cash in on cannabis boom Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief This little engine delivers results for DC children MORE (R-Ohio).

Davidson took the oath of office on the floor Thursday afternoon, two days after winning the special election for the western Ohio House seat. The seat has been vacant since BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLobbyists race to cash in on cannabis boom Rising star Ratcliffe faces battle to become Trump's intel chief This little engine delivers results for DC children MORE retired from Congress at the end of October.

Davidson may also soon become a member of the far-right House Freedom Caucus; the group’s chairman, fellow Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, endorsed him during the crowded 15-way primary. The group of conservatives led the push to oust Boehner out of the Speaker's office last fall, which resulted in Wisconsin Republican Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington Ex-Parkland students criticize Kellyanne Conway Latina leaders: 'It's a women's world more than anything' MORE ascending to the top House GOP leadership post.

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Former House Majority Leader Eric CantorEric Ivan CantorEmbattled Juul seeks allies in Washington GOP faces tough battle to become 'party of health care' 737 crisis tests Boeing's clout in Washington MORE (R-Va.) similarly had a successor for the seat he once represented become a part of the Freedom Caucus.

In a brief House floor speech after being sworn in to office, Davidson described how Boehner's sudden departure led to entering a race he wouldn't have otherwise expected.

“I understand that not a ton of you guys wanted the Speaker’s job, and you got drafted,” Davidson joked as he turned to directly address Ryan, who was presiding over House proceedings.

Davidson will serve out the rest of Boehner's term, which runs through the end of this year. He will be on the ballot again in the November general election to serve in the next session of Congress, beginning in January 2017.

The House now stands at a full 435 members, with 247 Republicans and 188 Democrats.