The only three "no" votes came from Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashCentrist Democrats 'strongly considering' discharge petition on GOP PPP bill On The Trail: How Nancy Pelosi could improbably become president History is on Edward Snowden's side: Now it's time to give him a full pardon MORE (R-Mich.), Tom Massie (R-Ky.), and Reid RibbleReid James RibbleFormer Sen. Tom Coburn dies at 72 Ex-GOP lawmakers side with NY in Supreme Court case over Trump tax returns Former GOP lawmakers, officials ask court to enforce House subpoena on McGahn MORE (R-Wis.).

Because the House of Representatives would run the contest, House passage is all that's needed. The resolution says the Committee on House Administration is tasked with coming up with the rules for the competition.

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Reps. Robert Andrews (D-N.J.) and George Miller (D-Calif.) used the debate to argue that the resolution is being overshadowed by the coming sequester, which they said will threaten job creation around the country. Both asked for unanimous consent that the House take up a Democratic bill that would replace the $85 billion in cuts with a mix of cuts and new taxes, but each time, the chair said that request has not been cleared by the leaders of both parties.

Just before voting on the resolution, the House voted 1-415 against adjourning the House. The House has held a handful of these votes this year, which appear to be designed to show the public that both parties want to stay in session and work.

In between votes, House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerLongtime House parliamentarian to step down Five things we learned from this year's primaries Bad blood between Pelosi, Meadows complicates coronavirus talks MORE (R-Ohio) offered his occasional reminder to members about proper floor procedure, including the need to dress appropriately. "You know who you are," he said to laughter.