Her bill, H.R. 1395, is co-sponsored by Reps. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeHonoring John Lewis's voting rights legacy Teacher-centric is good, but student-centric is better The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Teachers' union President Randi Weingarten calls Trump administration plan to reopen schools 'a train wreck'; US surpasses 3 million COVID-19 cases MORE (D-Ohio), Zoe Lofgren (D-Calif.), and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellRevered civil rights leader Rep. John Lewis lies in state in the Capitol House approves Clyburn proposal to rename voting rights bill after John Lewis John Lewis carried across Edmund Pettus Bridge for last time MORE (D-Ala.).

The bill is the latest entry to the list of legislation meant to tweak the national school lunch program. Sen. Tom HarkinThomas (Tom) Richard HarkinErnst challenges Greenfield to six debates in Iowa Senate race Biden unveils disability rights plan: 'Your voices must be heard' Bottom line MORE (D-Iowa), for example, has proposed the Healthy Lifestyles and Prevention America Act, S. 39, which would broaden the federal nutrition program, including by expanding it to childcare centers.

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Other proposals have been made by members looking to limit school lunch guidance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Last year, the USDA proposed calorie caps on school lunches, along with caps on grains and proteins that children can eat in meals served by schools.

The agency has since waived the cap on grains and proteins for two years. But last week, Rep. Rick CrawfordRick CrawfordRepublicans score procedural victory on Democrats' infrastructure bill The case for renewed US engagement in Latin America Arkansas program that places unemployed guards, reservists in agriculture jobs can be a model for nation MORE (R-Ark.) proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act, which would permanently eliminate those caps.

Crawford's bill, H.R. 1244, keeps in place the calorie caps that the USDA recommended. But Crawford says that repealing the grains and protein caps would give schools the flexibility to feed children properly.

"USDA's new school nutrition regulations are not working and are leaving students hungry," Crawford said last week. "In October, I hosted a Nutrition Summit in my district where I listened to school administrators, parents, nutritionists and teachers tell me how the nutrition guidelines are affecting their students."

Sens. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenDavis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Bottom line Bipartisan senators seek funding for pork producers forced to euthanize livestock MORE (R-N.D.) and Mark PryorMark Lunsford PryorCoronavirus poses risks for Trump in 2020 Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Medicaid rollback looms for GOP senators in 2020 MORE (D-Ark.) have proposed the Sensible School Lunch Act in the Senate.

Also last week, Reps. Fudge and Steve Stivers (R-Ohio) and proposed the bipartisan School Nutrition Flexibility Act, which also removes the protein and grain limit in school meals.

That bill, H.R. 1303, also lets local school authorities set prices for school meals. That would counteract the USDA's rule that set school lunch prices for the first time since 1946.

Last year, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) proposed the No Hungry Kids Act, which would repeal the department's calorie caps on meals served by schools.