A majority of House Republicans voted for a package on Friday providing more than $15 billion to aid communities impacted by Hurricane Harvey, a short-term extension of government funding and an increase of the debt limit.

But the lawmakers who opposed the measure, all of whom were Republicans, included a handful of Texas Republicans despite the hurricane devastating their state, top Democratic targets in 2018 and hard-line conservatives in the House Freedom Caucus.

Four Texas Republicans opposed the package: Reps. Joe Barton, Jeb Hensarling, Sam JohnsonSamuel (Sam) Robert JohnsonTexas New Members 2019 Many authors of GOP tax law will not be returning to Congress May brings key primaries across nation MORE and Mac Thornberry. But none of them represent counties deemed disaster areas by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

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Thornberry, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, said that he opposed the measure because it only included a three-month extension of government funding that he doesn’t think provides enough certainty for the military.

“Most concerning to me, and the reason I am voting against the bill, is that it forces our military to operate under a stopgap continuing resolution — once again,” Thornberry said in a statement.

“There is plenty of blame to go around between both parties and both the executive and legislative branches of government. But this negligence must stop. We must fulfill our duty. We must do better.”

Barton noted in his explanation of Friday’s vote that he did support a standalone Harvey aid package in the House earlier this week, which passed overwhelmingly by a vote of 419-3.

The Senate amended the bill in a Thursday vote to increase the level of disaster aid and add a short-term government spending bill through Dec. 8, with a debt limit hike ending around the same time.

But Barton cited the debt limit hike in the package as the reason why he could not support the final measure.

“I am not against voting for relief programs to help hurricane victims, but I am against raising the public debt ceiling without a plan to reduce deficits in the short term, and eliminate them in the long term. The money we vote to spend today will have to be paid back by our children and grandchildren,” he said.

Other conservative Texans, who are typically loath to vote for debt limit hikes without spending reforms, found themselves voting for one on Friday as they faced pressure to support Hurricane Harvey assistance. Reps. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertHillicon Valley: Facebook, Google face tough questions on white nationalism | Nielsen's exit raisers cyber worries | McConnell calls net neutrality bill 'dead on arrival' | Facebook changes terms for EU data Republicans offer 'free market alternative' to paid family leave YouTube shuts down comments on House hearing on white nationalism over hateful remarks MORE and Randy WeberRandall (Randy) Keith WeberHouse passes bill expressing support for NATO Texas governor, top lawmakers tell Trump not to use hurricane relief funds to build border wall To protect the environment, Trump should investigate Russian collusion MORE, who are both members of the Freedom Caucus, were among the 133 Republicans to vote for the package.

Leaders of the Freedom Caucus voted against the package, including Chairman Mark Meadows (N.C.) and Reps. Justin AmashJustin AmashBipartisan group asks DHS, ICE to halt deportations of Iraqi nationals Overnight Defense: House votes to end US support for Yemen war | Vote expected to force Trump's second veto of presidency | More Russian troops may head to Venezuela | First 'Space Force' hearing set for next week House ignores Trump veto threat, approves bill ending US support for Yemen war MORE (Mich.), Jim Jordan (Ohio), Scott Perry (Pa.), Dave Brat (Va.) and Mo BrooksMorris (Mo) Jackson BrooksGOP leaders dead set against Roy Moore in Alabama Poll: Roy Moore leading Alabama GOP field Alabama Holocaust Commission condemns GOP lawmaker's use of Hitler phrase 'big lie' MORE (Ala.).

The deal for the Harvey aid, government spending extension and debt limit increase was struck by President Trump and Democratic leaders during a White House meeting, despite objections from Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE (R-Wis.) and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Anti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age Former Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' MORE (R-Ky.) But both Ryan and McConnell decided to go along with Trump’s inclination to support the offer made by Democrats to extend the debt limit for only three months, instead of the 18 months the GOP had suggested.

Some members of the conservative Republican Study Committee joined Freedom Caucus members in opposing the package, including Chairman Mark Walker (R-N.C.).

A handful of GOP lawmakers expected to face competitive reelection races in 2018 also voted against the measure, including Reps. Peter Roskam (Ill.), Don Bacon (Neb.), Kevin YoderKevin Wayne YoderKansas Senate race splits wide open without Pompeo Mike Pompeo to speak at Missouri-Kansas Forum amid Senate bid speculation Yoder, Messer land on K Street MORE (Kan.), Duncan Hunter (Calif.) and Lee Zeldin (N.Y.).

Yoder notably is a member of the House Appropriations Committee, whose members typically join in supporting government spending bills that come out of the panel.

In a statement, Yoder noted his support for the standalone Hurricane Harvey aid bill earlier in the week but said he was “deeply frustrated” with the package he voted on Friday.

“That package was targeted, necessary, and narrowly met the immediate needs of victims. It spent taxpayer dollars wisely and didn’t take advantage of emergency needs to achieve other controversial priorities. Today’s package didn’t meet those standards,” Yoder said. “I strongly believe there are bipartisan compromises that work for the American people, but today’s short-term fix that kicks the can down the road wasn’t one of them.”