House sends resolution urging Trump to condemn white supremacists
© Getty Images

The House unanimously cleared a resolution on Tuesday that condemns white supremacists and urges President Trump to speak out against them.

The bipartisan resolution now heads to President Trump’s desk for his signature, making it the first formal response by Congress to the violence that broke out during a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va., last month.

"Tonight the House passed my resolution condemning hate groups & the Charlottesville attack. POTUS should sign a clear message & sign it ASAP," tweeted Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerDems can use subpoena power to reclaim the mantle of populism Is there a difference between good and bad online election targeting? Collusion judgment looms for key Senate panel MORE (D-Va.), one of those who introduced the resolution.

The resolution formally condemns “the racist violence and domestic terrorist attack” in Charlottesville, where a car suspected of being driven by a white supremacist sympathizer rammed into a crowd of counterprotesters. Heather Heyer, 32, died and at least 19 others were injured.

ADVERTISEMENT

The gathering of white supremacists began as a rally to protest the Charlottesville City Council’s decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

The resolution further “rejects white nationalism, white supremacy, and neo-Nazism as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contradictory to the values that define the people of the United States.”

Following concern from lawmakers of both parties about Trump’s equivocating response to the violence, the resolution urges Trump and his administration to speak out against white supremacist groups and “use all resources available” to improve data collection of hate crimes and “address the growing prevalence of those hate groups in the United States.”

Trump initially blamed the violence in Charlottesville on “many sides,” leading to condemnation from both Democrats and Republicans. He then issued a statement from the White House declaring that “racism is evil” and called out the KKK, neo-Nazis and other hate groups. But a day later, Trump defended his original remarks and said there were “some very fine people on both sides.”

Warner, along with Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineAmerica’s ball cap industry is in trouble Overnight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Democrats torch Trump for floating 'rogue killers' to blame for missing journalist MORE (D-Va.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerElection Countdown: Small-donor donations explode | Russian woman charged with midterm interference | Takeaways from North Dakota Senate debate | O'Rourke gives 'definitive no' to 2020 run | Dems hope Latino voters turn Arizona blue Democrats must end mob rule GOP senators praise Haley as 'powerful' and 'unafraid' MORE (R-Colo.) and Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonTrump renews attacks against Tester over VA nominee on eve of Montana rally House conservatives want ethics probe into Dems' handling of Kavanaugh allegations Senate eyes Kavanaugh floor vote next week MORE (R-Ga.) introduced the resolution last week, which cleared both chambers of Congress in the past 24 hours.