Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill
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House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Trump is betting big on the suburbs, but his strategy is failing 'bigly' Trump orders flags at half-staff to honor 'trailblazer' Ginsburg MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday blasted her home state GOP colleagues for supporting the House tax-reform bill despite the risk to their districts posed by eliminating the state and local tax deduction.

Pelosi emphasized that the legislation would have failed without the support of 11 California Republicans, many of whom are among Democrats’ top targets heading into the 2018 midterm elections.

“The more Californians learn about the bill, the more pressure Republicans will be under to change it. Only if California Republicans understand the political consequences will the bill be stopped,” Pelosi said in a statement.

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Only three California Republicans — Reps. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaDCCC reserves new ad buys in competitive districts, adds new members to 'Red to Blue' program Wife of former Rep. Duncan Hunter sentenced to 8 months of home confinement Harris endorses Democrat in tight California House race MORE, Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockHouse to vote on removing cannabis from list of controlled substances House votes to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Cook shifts 20 House districts toward Democrats MORE and Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherDemocrat Harley Rouda advances in California House primary Lawyers to seek asylum for Assange in France: report Rohrabacher tells Yahoo he discussed pardon with Assange for proof Russia didn't hack DNC email MORE — were among the 13 GOP defectors last week. House GOP leaders could only have afforded 23 defections and still passed the legislation.

The three California GOP lawmakers who opposed the bill all cited the legislation’s proposed elimination of the state and local tax deduction, which many of their constituents use to prevent double taxation in a high-tax state. The House GOP tax plan would also cap the property tax deduction at $10,000, unlike the Senate version which does not include such a provision.

“Unfortunately, I fear that the plan as approved could actually make the incredible burden our state’s taxpayers feel even worse. I voted no because my constituents don’t deserve a tax increase,” Issa wrote in an Orange County Register op-ed.

The rest of the Republican members in the California congressional delegation, led by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump asked Chamber of Commerce to reconsider Democratic endorsements: report The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - White House moves closer to Pelosi on virus relief bill Trump's sharp words put CDC director on hot seat MORE (R-Calif.), voted for the legislation: Reps. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaDemocrats hit Interior secretary for reportedly refusing to wear mask in meeting with tribes GOP lawmakers plan measure to force Americans to divest from firms linked to Chinese military: report House lawmakers advocate to preserve medical funding for underserved, rural areas MORE, Paul CookPaul Joseph CookLawmakers seek extension for tribes to spend stimulus money following Treasury delays The 14 other key races to watch on Super Tuesday Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel MORE, Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John DenhamBottom line Bottom line Lobbying world MORE, David Valadao, Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Sunday shows preview: With less than two months to go, race for the White House heats up Sunday shows preview: Republicans gear up for national convention, USPS debate continues in Washington MORE, Steve Knight, Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceThe 'extraordinary rendition' of a US Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient, 'Hotel Rwanda' hero Gil Cisneros to face Young Kim in rematch of 2018 House race in California The most expensive congressional races of the last decade MORE, Ken CalvertKenneth (Ken) Stanton CalvertMORE, Mimi Walters and Duncan HunterDuncan HunterDCCC reserves new ad buys in competitive districts, adds new members to 'Red to Blue' program Wife of former Rep. Duncan Hunter sentenced to 8 months of home confinement Harris endorses Democrat in tight California House race MORE.

More than half of those lawmakers are at the top of Democrats’ target lists for next year’s elections. Denham, Valadao, Knight, Royce and Walters all represent crossover districts won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJeff Flake: Republicans 'should hold the same position' on SCOTUS vacancy as 2016 Momentum growing among Republicans for Supreme Court vote before Election Day Warning signs flash for Lindsey Graham in South Carolina MORE.

Some of those Republicans said that they voted for the legislation based on pledges from GOP leaders to make changes later.

Walters, for example, said in a statement that she “received a personal commitment” from House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyBusinesses, states pass on Trump payroll tax deferral Trump order on drug prices faces long road to finish line On The Money: US deficit hits trillion amid pandemic | McConnell: Chance for relief deal 'doesn't look that good' | House employees won't have payroll taxes deferred MORE (R-Texas) that “changes will be made to the final version of tax reform to benefit Orange County residents.”

An analysis by the Tax Policy Center found that 46 percent of returns filed in Walters’s district used the state and local tax deduction.

“Unfortunately, due to reckless tax and spend policies enacted by the California State Legislature, California suffers from the highest taxes in the nation. We must ensure Washington doesn’t put similar tax burdens on Orange County residents,” Walters said.

Valadao, meanwhile, said that only 17 percent of his Central Valley district’s residents currently itemize their tax returns and estimated that number would drop to 5 percent under the GOP tax proposal.

“By creating a simpler and fairer tax code, we will create jobs, grow our economy and increase the amount of money Central Valley workers take home,” Valadao said.