Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill
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House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiJohn Lewis joins Ocasio-Cortez on climate change push Dem House newcomers split on supporting Pelosi for Speaker Reelection campaign starts now, like it or not MORE (D-Calif.) on Monday blasted her home state GOP colleagues for supporting the House tax-reform bill despite the risk to their districts posed by eliminating the state and local tax deduction.

Pelosi emphasized that the legislation would have failed without the support of 11 California Republicans, many of whom are among Democrats’ top targets heading into the 2018 midterm elections.

“The more Californians learn about the bill, the more pressure Republicans will be under to change it. Only if California Republicans understand the political consequences will the bill be stopped,” Pelosi said in a statement.

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Only three California Republicans — Reps. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaDemocratic gains erasing House GOP in California California New Members 2019 Dem Mike Levin wins Issa's open House seat in southern California MORE, Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockRep. Mike Johnson wins race for RSC chairman House Republicans set to elect similar team of leaders despite midterm thumping House committee votes to relax Endangered Species Act MORE and Dana RohrabacherDana Tyrone RohrabacherDemocratic gains erasing House GOP in California California New Members 2019 McCarthy defeats Jordan for minority leader in 159-to-43 vote MORE — were among the 13 GOP defectors last week. House GOP leaders could only have afforded 23 defections and still passed the legislation.

The three California GOP lawmakers who opposed the bill all cited the legislation’s proposed elimination of the state and local tax deduction, which many of their constituents use to prevent double taxation in a high-tax state. The House GOP tax plan would also cap the property tax deduction at $10,000, unlike the Senate version which does not include such a provision.

“Unfortunately, I fear that the plan as approved could actually make the incredible burden our state’s taxpayers feel even worse. I voted no because my constituents don’t deserve a tax increase,” Issa wrote in an Orange County Register op-ed.

The rest of the Republican members in the California congressional delegation, led by House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump heads to California to meet first responders amid deadly wildfires Hillicon Valley: Russian-linked hackers may have impersonated US officials | Trump signs DHS cyber bill | Prosecutors inadvertently reveal charges against Assange | Accenture workers protest border enforcement work | App mines crypto for bail bonds McCarthy, other Republicans back Ratcliffe to be next attorney general MORE (R-Calif.), voted for the legislation: Reps. Doug LaMalfaDouglas (Doug) LaMalfaOver 100 lawmakers consistently voted against chemical safeguards: report Worst-case scenario for House GOP is 70-seat wipeout McCarthy joins push asking Trump for more wildfire aid in California MORE, Paul CookPaul Joseph CookGOP House candidate once called Obama a secret Muslim who sympathizes with terrorists: report Overnight Defense: VA pick breezes through confirmation hearing | House votes to move on defense bill negotiations | Senate bill would set 'stringent' oversight on North Korea talks Stop foreign outsourcing of government travel: How a GSA decision is costing American jobs, harming our military MORE, Jeff DenhamJeffrey (Jeff) John DenhamDemocratic gains erasing House GOP in California California New Members 2019 Election Countdown: Hyde-Smith's 'public hanging' joke shakes up Mississippi runoff | New lawsuits in Florida | Trump wants Florida election official fired | Mia Love sues to stop Utah vote count | Republican MacArthur loses NJ House race MORE, David Valadao, Devin NunesDevin Gerald NunesHeads up, GOP: Elections have consequences Overnight Energy: Trump, California leaders clash over fires | Trump says oil prices should be 'much lower' | Zinke criticizes media coverage | Officials consider new truck pollution rule Trump, California battle over climate and cause of fires MORE, Steve Knight, Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceDem Gil Cisneros scores win in open-seat race in California Overnight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Border deployment 'peaked' at 5,800 troops | Trump sanctions 17 Saudis over Khashoggi killing | Senators offer bill to press Trump on Saudis | Paul effort to block Bahrain arms sale fails Democratic gains erasing House GOP in California MORE, Ken CalvertKenneth (Ken) Stanton CalvertMORE, Mimi Walters and Duncan HunterDuncan Duane HunterProposed House GOP rules would force indicted lawmakers to step down from leader roles: report Overnight Defense: What the midterms mean for defense panels | Pompeo cancels North Korea meeting | Trump eyes Kim summit in early 2019 | Pentagon drops name for border mission GOP Rep. Duncan Hunter wins reelection despite criminal charges MORE.

More than half of those lawmakers are at the top of Democrats’ target lists for next year’s elections. Denham, Valadao, Knight, Royce and Walters all represent crossover districts won by Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRetired lieutenant general tears into Trump over attacks against Navy SEAL: 'Disgusting' Retired admiral who oversaw bin Laden raid doubles down on Trump criticism Trump dismisses criticism from Navy SEAL who led Osama bin Laden mission MORE.

Some of those Republicans said that they voted for the legislation based on pledges from GOP leaders to make changes later.

Walters, for example, said in a statement that she “received a personal commitment” from House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin BradyKevin Patrick BradyGOP lawmaker pushes back on Trump drug pricing proposal Tax law failed to save GOP majority Overnight Health Care — Presented by The Partnership for Safe Medicines — Juul halts retail sales for most flavored e-cigs | CDC confirms 90 cases of rare polio-like illness | Physicians push back on Trump plans to redefine gender MORE (R-Texas) that “changes will be made to the final version of tax reform to benefit Orange County residents.”

An analysis by the Tax Policy Center found that 46 percent of returns filed in Walters’s district used the state and local tax deduction.

“Unfortunately, due to reckless tax and spend policies enacted by the California State Legislature, California suffers from the highest taxes in the nation. We must ensure Washington doesn’t put similar tax burdens on Orange County residents,” Walters said.

Valadao, meanwhile, said that only 17 percent of his Central Valley district’s residents currently itemize their tax returns and estimated that number would drop to 5 percent under the GOP tax proposal.

“By creating a simpler and fairer tax code, we will create jobs, grow our economy and increase the amount of money Central Valley workers take home,” Valadao said.