Women, Dems leading sexual harassment discussion in Congress: analysis
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Female and Democratic lawmakers are both minorities in Congress, but a new report shows that they’ve been the most outspoken about sexual assault and harassment.

An analysis conducted by Quorum, a Washington, D.C.-based legislative and public affairs tracking firm, found that women account for more than half of the dialogue about sexual misconduct this year, while comprising only 20 percent of Congress.

Quorum analyzed 2,615 press releases, floor statements, constituent newsletters and social media posts from campaign and official accounts as of late Monday afternoon for discussion of sexual assault and harassment. 

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The analysis found that women in Congress made up 53 percent of the discussion about sexual harassment and assault, while men made up 47 percent.

A total of 89 women, including non-voting delegates, serve in the House, compared to 352 men. Across the Capitol, the 100-member Senate has only 21 women.

The likelihood of a lawmaker speaking out about sexual assault and harassment was even more stark by partisan affiliation. Quorum found that Democrats made up 74 percent of discussion about the issue, while Republicans accounted for only 26 percent.

Quorum provided The Hill with data updated as of late Monday afternoon with 21 more lawmaker statements since its original study conducted last week that still showed the same overall findings.

Female lawmakers have been leading the legislative efforts to reform Capitol Hill’s workplace harassment and discrimination policies in recent weeks.

Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierDem lawmaker: Trump Jr. lied to Congress on two occasions House Dems plan to re-interview witnesses from Russia probe Hakeem Jeffries defeats Barbara Lee to become Dem caucus chair MORE (D-Calif.) and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandNRA's Loesch: Gillibrand’s 'future Is female’ tweet 'is pretty sexist' Would-be 2020 Dem candidates head for the exits Rubio mocks Gillibrand tweet saying the future is ‘female’ and ‘intersectional’ MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced bipartisan legislation called the “ME TOO Congress Act” — borrowing the popular hashtag that helped ignite discussion about sexual harassment in recent weeks — to overhaul the current process available to staff to report harassment.

Before introducing her bill, Speier had posted a video sharing her own experience: while she was working as a congressional staffer in the 1970s, a chief of staff forcibly kissed her, she said.

Other female lawmakers have also shared their experiences of sexual harassment in recent weeks.

Rep. Diana DeGetteDiana Louise DeGetteOvernight Energy: Dems seek answers on Trump climate policies | Trump officials want changes to forest management after wildfires | UN environment chief resigns House Dems demand records on Trump’s climate rollbacks Overnight Health Care: Top Trump refugee official taking new HHS job | Tom Price joins new Georgia governor's transition | FDA tobacco crackdown draws ire from the right MORE (D-Colo.) told MSNBC last week that former Rep. Bob Filner (D-Calif.) tried to pin her against an elevator door and kiss her. And Rep. Linda Sánchez (D-Calif.) told The Associated Press that she had been sexually harassed by two male colleagues since she began serving in the House, one of whom she said is no longer in Congress.

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharHillicon Valley: Huawei executive facing possible US fraud charges | Dem blames White House for failure of election security bill | FCC investigating wireless carriers over coverage data | Assange rejects deal to leave embassy Warner blames White House for election security bill not passing Congress Graham vows to push Trump’s AG pick through Judiciary Committee MORE (Minn.), the top Democrat on the Senate Rules Committee, co-authored a resolution that the Senate adopted earlier this month to require sexual harassment awareness training for members and staff. Sens. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyOvernight Health Care: House set to vote on bill targeting drug companies for overcharging Medicaid | Dems press Trump officials on pre-existing conditions | Tobacco giant invests .8B in Canadian marijuana grower House set to vote on bill cracking down on drug companies overcharging Medicaid Trump tells McConnell to let Senate vote on criminal justice reform MORE (R-Iowa), Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump flubs speech location at criminal justice conference Sunday shows preview: Trade talks, Cohen sentencing memo take center stage Trump tells McConnell to let Senate vote on criminal justice reform MORE (R-Ky.), Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyHouse Republican partisan riders could poison federal budget talks Senate sends two-week funding measure to Trump Overnight Defense: GOP senators rip Saudi prince after CIA briefing | Top general says Afghan war at a stalemate | Mattis extends border mission through January | Pompeo gives Russia deadline on nuclear arms treaty MORE (R-Ala.), Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoDole salute embodies emotion of Bush farewell Hispanic Caucus sets red lines on DHS spending bill Republican leaders seek to calm shutdown worries MORE (R-W.Va.) and Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) were also involved in the resolution’s introduction.

The House is set to adopt a similar resolution requiring anti-harassment training for its members and staff on Wednesday. Rep. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockVirginia New Members 2019 Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president GOP lawmaker defends Mia Love from Trump attacks: 'I was disgusted when I heard it' MORE (R-Va.) is the chief sponsor of the measure.

That’s not to say female lawmakers are the only ones pushing legislation to overhaul Capitol Hill harassment policies. Rep. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisLewandowski, Florida state senators tussle over Trump's influence on midterms: report Can the climate movement survive populism? Lessons from 'yellow vest' protests Andrew Gillum met with Obama during DC visit: report MORE (R-Fla.) plans to introduce a bill this week that would prohibit the use of taxpayer dollars to settle sexual harassment claims involving lawmakers or congressional staff, require any lawmaker named in a settlement to reimburse taxpayers and make public all settlement payments funded by taxpayers.

The Office of Compliance released data earlier this month showing that more than $17 million in settlements were paid out to victims, which included cases apart from sexual harassment like racial or religious discrimination. Settlements are paid out by a special fund operated by the Treasury.

However, BuzzFeed reported last week that a former staffer to Rep. John ConyersJohn James ConyersBrenda Jones sworn into House for final weeks of 2018 GOP approves rule for Don Young Michigan New Members 2019 MORE Jr. (D-Mich.) who accused him of sexual harassment was paid a more than $27,000 settlement from his taxpayer-funded office instead of the Treasury fund. Conyers has denied wrongdoing and said the settlement was made to avoid protracted litigation.

Conyers has since stepped aside from his position as ranking Democrat on the powerful House Judiciary Committee. Only one lawmaker — female Democratic Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceWHIP LIST: Pelosi seeks path to 218 The Hill's Morning Report — Intraparty skirmishes light up lame-duck session Pelosi wins, but needs more votes on floor MORE (N.Y.) — has called for Conyers to resign altogether.