Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Next 24 hours critical for stalled funding talks Democrat vows to move forward with impeachment, dividing his party Citing Virginia race scandals, Dem vows vote to impeach Trump MORE (D-Texas) is seeking to force a House floor vote later Wednesday on impeaching President Trump, setting up a tougher decision for Democrats than Republicans.

Green’s resolution is expected to fail, given widespread opposition among Republicans and most Democrats.

House Democratic leaders aren’t in favor of pushing impeachment at this point as they seek to win back the majority next year. Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Trump, Dems open drug price talks | FDA warns against infusing young people's blood | Facebook under scrutiny over health data | Harris says Medicare for all isn't socialism Dems think they're beating Trump in emergency declaration battle Steve King asks for Congressional Record correction over white supremacist quote MORE (D-Calif.) and other senior Democrats in believe that talk of impeachment at this point is premature, citing the ongoing special counsel probe into Russian election interference.

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Democratic leaders are expected to oppose Green’s resolution, but aides said they aren’t whipping rank-and-file members on the measure.

Under House rules, any member can trigger a floor vote on a “privileged” resolution within two legislative days after it is introduced.

Green will use that process to make the House consider his articles of impeachment, which argue that Trump has “brought shame and dishonor to the office of the president” by “sowing discord among the people of the United States.”

As examples, Green’s articles of impeachment cite Trump’s equivocating response to the violence at a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va., in August, as well as his attacks on NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality.

Green said he plans to go to the House floor around noon to start action on his impeachment measure.

House GOP leaders are expected to reject the measure, but Green can still force a procedural vote that will effectively serve as the first vote in Congress on impeaching Trump.

“I’m a person who travels the road less traveled. And I know that this is a bumpy road,” Green said on C-SPAN’s “Washington Journal” Wednesday morning.

Despite the concerns from fellow Democrats, Green said he is pushing impeachment now as a matter of conscience.

"As I have said before, this is not about Democrats, it is about democracy. It is not about Republicans, it is about the fate of our Republic. May everyone vote their conscience knowing that history will judge us all," Green wrote in a letter to fellow lawmakers on Tuesday.

The vote could either be a direct referendum on the contents of the measure, or a motion to table the resolution or send it to committee.

At least a handful of fellow Democrats may vote for Green’s resolution.

Green was among six House Democrats last month to unveil articles of impeachment alleging Trump obstructed justice by firing former FBI Director James Comey amid the investigation into Russia’s election meddling; violating the foreign emoluments clause barring public officials from receiving gifts from foreign governments without the consent of Congress; and undermining the judiciary and the press.

Green and Reps. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDems ready aggressive response to Trump emergency order, as GOP splinters Democrat vows to move forward with impeachment, dividing his party Five takeaways from acting AG's fiery House hearing MORE (Tenn.), Luis Gutiérrez (Ill.), Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeCongressional Black Caucus faces tough decision on Harris, Booker Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee to step down as CBC Foundation chair amid lawsuit Reporter says to expect Capitol Hill to take action on North Carolina's 9th District MORE (Ohio), John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthTrump: Top Dems aren't allowing negotiators to make border security deal Dem rep: 'If Mick Mulvaney were president, we could’ve solved' border talks at Camp David retreat Bipartisan House group heads to Camp David retreat MORE (Ky.) and Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralHere are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown 8-year-old boy dies in CBP custody Hispanic Caucus picks Castro as its next chair MORE (N.Y.) were among the Democrats who sponsored the articles of impeachment.

In addition, Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanDemocrat vows to move forward with impeachment, dividing his party Trump pick sets up fight over World Bank Pelosi puts tight grip on talk of Trump impeachment MORE (D-Calif.) introduced an article of impeachment in July alleging that Trump obstructed justice by firing Comey.