An unexpectedly high number of Democrats voted in favor of an effort to launch impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden adds to vote margin over Trump after Milwaukee County recount Krebs says allegations of foreign interference in 2020 election 'farcical'  Republicans ready to become deficit hawks again under a President Biden MORE on Wednesday, revealing the growing agitation among liberals to remove him from office.

The House voted overwhelmingly 364-58 to table a resolution from Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenRemoving slurs, bigotry from places on our maps paves the way to remove them from all aspects of our lives Safeguarding US elections by sanctioning Russian sovereign debt The Memo: Trump furor stokes fears of unrest MORE (D-Texas) laying out articles of impeachment against Trump, with four Democrats voting “present.”

All Republicans voted with 126 Democrats to defeat the resolution. Those Democrats included Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGovernors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation MORE (Calif.) and Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Hoyer on Trump election challenges: 'I think this borders on treason' Capitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview MORE (Md.), who announced ahead of the vote they would vote to table the effort.

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They cited the ongoing investigations by congressional committees and the FBI special counsel.

“Now is not the time to consider articles of impeachment,” Pelosi and Hoyer said.

Yet 58 Democrats, including Green, voted against tabling the resolution. Reps. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroMeet the three Democrats who could lead foreign affairs in the House Hispanic Caucus endorses Castro for Foreign Affairs gavel Progressive Democrats call on Pompeo to condemn Israeli demolition of Beduin village MORE (Texas), Marc VeaseyMarc Allison VeaseyTwo lawmakers announce bids to succeed Bustos at DCCC Bustos won't seek to chair DCCC again in wake of 2020 results Democrats' post-election 'family meeting' descends into chaos MORE (Texas), Carol Shea-PorterCarol Shea-PorterThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority New Hampshire New Members 2019 Democrat Chris Pappas wins New Hampshire House seat MORE (N.H.) and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellLobbying world Democrats to determine leaders after disappointing election Century of the Woman: The State of Women and Voting Rights MORE (Ala.) voted “present.” Shea-Porter represents a district won by Trump in 2016.

“The resolution received fifty-seven more votes than many expected. This is the first vote, but it will not be the last,” Green said in a statement.

Here’s a look at the Democrats who voted in favor of starting to impeach Trump.

Impeachment agitators

A handful of Democrats apart from Green had also been calling for Trump’s impeachment. Lawmakers including Reps. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersOn The Money: Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed | Trump administration proposal takes aim at bank pledges to avoid fossil fuel financing | JPMorgan: Economy will shrink in first quarter due to COVID-19 spike Democrats accuse Mnuchin of sabotaging economy in dispute with Fed Maxine Waters says Biden win is 'dawn of a new progressive America' MORE (Calif.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuHouse Democrats pick Aguilar as No. 6 leader in next Congress Democrats to determine leaders after disappointing election Mark Cuban asks voters to 'reconsider' donating to Georgia run-off elections MORE (Calif.) endorsed impeaching Trump months ago.

Waters and Lieu in particular have built higher profiles since Trump took office through their sharp criticism of the president. Twitter this week released data showing Lieu, who often takes aim at Trump through the platform, as the fifth top account among U.S. elected officials.

Green’s articles of impeachment stated that Trump has “brought disrepute, contempt, ridicule and disgrace on the presidency” and “sown discord among the people of the United States.” The articles cited Trump’s response to the violent clash between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va., and attacks on NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality as examples of how Trump has divided the nation.

Other Democrats who have also filed articles of impeachment supported Green’s effort on Wednesday.

Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanMeet the three Democrats who could lead foreign affairs in the House Hispanic Caucus endorses Castro for Foreign Affairs gavel Dozens of progressive groups endorse Joaquin Castro for Foreign Affairs chair MORE (D-Calif.) introduced an article of impeachment in July alleging that Trump obstructed justice by firing James ComeyJames Brien ComeyTop Republicans praise Trump's Flynn pardon The new marshmallow media in the Biden era McCabe defends investigation of Trump before Senate committee: We had 'many reasons' MORE as FBI director amid the investigation of Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election.

And last month, Green and five other Democrats introduced articles of impeachment that similarly accuse Trump of obstructing justice, violating the foreign emoluments clause barring the president from taking gifts from foreign governments and undermining the courts and media.

Reps. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDe Blasio mum on whether he'll block sale of Mets to controversial investor Two ethics groups call on House to begin impeachment inquiry against Barr Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL MORE (Tenn.), Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeClyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Kerry says Paris climate deal alone 'is not enough' | EPA halts planned Taiwan trip for Wheeler| EPA sued over rule extending life of toxic coal ash ponds Major unions back Fudge for Agriculture secretary MORE (Ohio), Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralLawmakers call for small business aid at all levels of government The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy On the Money: Administration to ban TikTok, WeChat | House moves toward bill to avoid government shutdown | Coronavirus relief bills boosted GDP, CBO says MORE (N.Y.), Luis Gutiérrez (Ill.) and John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthThe GOP's debt boogieman is hurting families and derailing our recovery Pelosi, Democrats unveil bills to rein in alleged White House abuses of power GOP, White House struggle to unite behind COVID-19 relief MORE (Ky.) introduced those articles of impeachment with Green. All but Gutiérrez, who did not vote, and Yarmuth, who voted to table the resolution, supported Green’s efforts.

Yarmuth serves as the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee.

Many progressives who haven’t introduced impeachment measures also voted for Green’s resolution.

Liberal Democrats like Reps. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalBiden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Trump, attorneys step up efforts to reverse election's outcome MORE (Wash.), Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinDemocrats debate fate of Trump probes if Biden wins Congress must repeal tax breaks for the wealthy passed in CARES Act COVID-19 and the problem of presidential succession MORE (Md.), Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyFeinstein departure from top post sets stage for Judiciary fight Pelosi, Mnuchin continue COVID-19 talks amid dwindling odds for deal Pocan won't seek another term as Progressive Caucus co-chair MORE (Ill.), Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.), and Keith EllisonKeith Maurice EllisonProgressives unveil Biden Cabinet wish list Officers involved with George Floyd killing will stand trial together in Minneapolis, judge decides Trump lashes out at state officials over virus restrictions at Minnesota rally MORE (Minn.) were among the lawmakers who voted against tabling Green’s resolution.

Ellison serves as deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee.

Congressional Black Caucus members

Green, a member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), was joined by many of his fellow caucus members who have expressed disgust with Trump's handling of race relations.

CBC Chairman Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondClyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts Biden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Five House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet MORE (D-La.) voted against tabling Green’s resolution. So did Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), who as assistant House minority leader was the only member of Democratic leadership to vote with Green.

Green’s articles of impeachment also cited Trump’s personal attacks against fellow CBC member, Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonFive House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet Lobbying world Harris calls it 'outrageous' Trump downplayed coronavirus MORE (D-Fla.). Trump called Wilson “wacky” on Twitter after she criticized his handling of a conversation with the family of Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed during an October ambush in Niger.

Wilson was among the lawmakers who voted with Green.

Reps. Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsRecord number of Black women elected to Congress in 2020 Armed Trump supporter arrested at North Carolina polling place From HBCUs to Capitol Hill: How Congress can play an important role MORE (N.C.), Karen BassKaren Ruth BassThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience Five House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet Pressure grows on California governor to name Harris replacement MORE (Calif.), Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyTrump's controversial diversity order expected to see swift reversal under Biden Companies start responding to pressure to bolster minority representation Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry MORE (Ohio), Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeLawmakers call for small business aid at all levels of government The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Washington on edge amid SCOTUS vacancy The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Top tech executives testify in blockbuster antitrust hearing MORE (N.Y.), Lacy ClayWilliam (Lacy) Lacy ClayIncoming lawmaker says her Breonna Taylor mask has colleagues calling her Breonna Record number of Black women elected to Congress in 2020 Six people whose election wins made history MORE (Mo.), Danny K. Davis (Ill.), Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Will the next coronavirus relief package leave essential workers behind? Bipartisan GROCER Act would give tax break to frontline workers MORE (Pa.), Fudge, Alcee HastingsAlcee (Judge) Lamar HastingsFlorida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum Poisoning of Putin opponent could test US-Moscow relationship Florida county official apologizes for social media post invoking Hitler  MORE (Fla.), Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeePocan won't seek another term as Progressive Caucus co-chair Grand jury charges no officers in Breonna Taylor death Hillicon Valley: Murky TikTok deal raises questions about China's role | Twitter investigating automated image previews over apparent algorithmic bias | House approves bill making hacking federal voting systems a crime MORE (Texas), Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyHouse Democrats pick Aguilar as No. 6 leader in next Congress Lawmakers push for improved diabetes care through tech advancements Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities MORE (Ill.), Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceHillicon Valley: FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden | Treasury Dept. sanctions Iranian government-backed hackers Lawmakers call for expanded AI role in education, business to remain competitive The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (Mich.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeDemocrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Top contender for Biden Defense chief would be historic pick Overnight Defense: 5 US service members killed in international peacekeeping helicopter crash in Egypt | Progressives warn Biden against Defense nominee with contractor ties | Trump executive order to ban investment in Chinese military-linked companies MORE (Calif.), John LewisJohn LewisDemocrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains Biden must look to executive action to fulfill vow to Black Americans The purposeful is political: Gen Z bowls over their doubters MORE (Ga.), Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreDemocrats accuse Kushner of 'casual racism' over comments about Black Americans Lawmakers urge IRS to get stimulus payments to domestic violence survivors Texas Democrat: US natural gas vital in transition to renewables MORE (Wis.), Bobby RushBobby Lee RushHillicon Valley: Judge's ruling creates fresh hurdle for TikTok | House passes bills to secure energy sector against cyberattacks | Biden campaign urges Facebook to remove Trump posts spreading 'falsehoods' House passes bills to secure energy sector against cyberattacks Congress should investigate OAS actions in Bolivia MORE (Ill.), Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHouse Democrats subpoena private prison operator in forced hysterectomy case Trump relents as GSA informs Biden transition to begin Hillicon Valley: Leadership changes at top cyber agency raise national security concerns | Snapchat launches in-app video platform 'Spotlight' | Uber, Lyft awarded federal transportation contract MORE (Miss.), Waters and Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanDemocratic Women's Caucus members split endorsements for House campaign chief Democrats smell blood with new DHS whistleblower complaint New Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries MORE (N.J.) made up the remaining CBC members who voted against tabling Green’s resolution.

Not all CBC members joined in. Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesHouse Democrats pick Aguilar as No. 6 leader in next Congress Nominated for another Speaker term, Pelosi says it's her last Katherine Clark secures No. 4 leadership spot for House Democrats MORE (N.Y.), who helps lead House Democrats’ messaging, voted to table the impeachment resolution.

The unexpected

Multiple Democrats who serve as the ranking member on House committees showed their support for impeaching Trump.

They included Reps. Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterDemocrats must go on the offensive against voter suppression House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Sotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame MORE (N.Y.), the top Democrat on the House Rules Committee; Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneHouse Democrats urge Amazon to investigate, recall 'defective' products Asbestos ban stalls in Congress amid partisan fight Pharma execs say FDA will not lower standards for coronavirus vaccine MORE (N.J.), who leads Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee; and Robert Brady (Pa.), who serves as ranking member of the House Administration Committee.

Then there was Rep. Michael CapuanoMichael (Mike) Everett CapuanoHillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy Inside the progressive hunt for vulnerable House Democrats MORE (D-Mass.), who as recently as this summer warned against forcing Democrats to go on the record about impeachment.

At the time, Sherman had mulled possibly forcing a vote on his article of impeachment using the same process Green did on Wednesday. Capuano spoke up during a House Democratic caucus meeting to caution about the consequences for the party’s efforts to win the majority in 2018.

But on Wednesday, Capuano said in a Facebook post that it’s “time to have an open, honest debate on President Trump and his fitness for office.”

“Practically and politically, I think most of us can agree that passing articles of impeachment in this House isn’t realistic at this moment in our history. But sometimes, it’s more important to follow your heart than do the practical or political calculation,” Capuano wrote.