An unexpectedly high number of Democrats voted in favor of an effort to launch impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Gosar's siblings pen op-ed urging for his resignation: 'You are immune to shame' Sunday shows - Delta variant, infrastructure dominate MORE on Wednesday, revealing the growing agitation among liberals to remove him from office.

The House voted overwhelmingly 364-58 to table a resolution from Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenManchin meets with Texas lawmakers on voting rights Lawmakers roll out legislation to defend pipelines against cyber threats Bipartisan lawmakers call for action on anti-hate crime measures MORE (D-Texas) laying out articles of impeachment against Trump, with four Democrats voting “present.”

All Republicans voted with 126 Democrats to defeat the resolution. Those Democrats included Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiManchin on reported boos at Democratic luncheon: 'I heard a lot of nos' Kinzinger supports Jan. 6 panel subpoenas for Republicans, including McCarthy Ocasio-Cortez: Democrats can't blame GOP for end of eviction moratorium MORE (Calif.) and Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerProgressives camp outside Capitol to protest evictions House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Top Democrat: 'A lot of spin' coming from White House on infrastructure MORE (Md.), who announced ahead of the vote they would vote to table the effort.

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They cited the ongoing investigations by congressional committees and the FBI special counsel.

“Now is not the time to consider articles of impeachment,” Pelosi and Hoyer said.

Yet 58 Democrats, including Green, voted against tabling the resolution. Reps. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroLawmakers can't reconcile weakening the SALT cap with progressive goals House Democrats reintroduce bill addressing diversity at State Department Julian Castro joins NBC and MSNBC as political analyst MORE (Texas), Marc VeaseyMarc Allison VeaseyWe must address the declining rate of startup business launches Ted Cruz accuses Democrats of proposing 'Jim Crow 2.0' voting legislation The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Voting rights will be on '22, '24 ballots MORE (Texas), Carol Shea-PorterCarol Shea-PorterThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority New Hampshire New Members 2019 Democrat Chris Pappas wins New Hampshire House seat MORE (N.H.) and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellDemocratic tensions simmer in House between left, center Alabama museum unveils restored Greyhound bus for Freedom Rides' 60th anniversary Rep. Terri Sewell declines to run for Senate in Alabama MORE (Ala.) voted “present.” Shea-Porter represents a district won by Trump in 2016.

“The resolution received fifty-seven more votes than many expected. This is the first vote, but it will not be the last,” Green said in a statement.

Here’s a look at the Democrats who voted in favor of starting to impeach Trump.

Impeachment agitators

A handful of Democrats apart from Green had also been calling for Trump’s impeachment. Lawmakers including Reps. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersOn The Money: Justice Department says Trump's tax returns should be released | Democrats fall short of votes for extending eviction ban House adjourns for recess without passing bill to extend federal eviction ban Pelosi calls on CDC to extend eviction moratorium unilaterally MORE (Calif.) and Ted LieuTed W. LieuMcCarthy jokes it'll be hard not to 'hit' Pelosi with gavel if he is Speaker Court finds Democratic donor Ed Buck guilty of all charges in connection to two men's deaths Press: Give those unemployed writers a job! MORE (Calif.) endorsed impeaching Trump months ago.

Waters and Lieu in particular have built higher profiles since Trump took office through their sharp criticism of the president. Twitter this week released data showing Lieu, who often takes aim at Trump through the platform, as the fifth top account among U.S. elected officials.

Green’s articles of impeachment stated that Trump has “brought disrepute, contempt, ridicule and disgrace on the presidency” and “sown discord among the people of the United States.” The articles cited Trump’s response to the violent clash between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va., and attacks on NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality as examples of how Trump has divided the nation.

Other Democrats who have also filed articles of impeachment supported Green’s effort on Wednesday.

Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanHow Congress can advance peace with North Korea Omar feuds with Jewish Democrats Lawmakers tout bipartisan support for resolution criticizing Iran's government MORE (D-Calif.) introduced an article of impeachment in July alleging that Trump obstructed justice by firing James ComeyJames Brien ComeyBiden sister has book deal, set to publish in April Mystery surrounds Justice's pledge on journalist records NYT publisher: DOJ phone records seizure a 'dangerous incursion' on press freedom MORE as FBI director amid the investigation of Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election.

And last month, Green and five other Democrats introduced articles of impeachment that similarly accuse Trump of obstructing justice, violating the foreign emoluments clause barring the president from taking gifts from foreign governments and undermining the courts and media.

Reps. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenOmar leads lawmakers in calling for US envoy to combat Islamophobia Trump says being impeached twice didn't change him: 'I became worse' Five big questions about the Jan. 6 select committee MORE (Tenn.), Marcia FudgeMarcia FudgeThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - A huge win for Biden, centrist senators Women's March endorses Nina Turner in first-ever electoral endorsement Biden celebrates anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act MORE (Ohio), Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralHouse at war over Jan. 6 inquiry, mask mandate NYC snafu the latest flub from a broken elections agency The Memo: Harris, Ocasio-Cortez and the Democratic divide on immigration MORE (N.Y.), Luis Gutiérrez (Ill.) and John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthDemocrats look to flip script on GOP 'defund the police' attacks Democrats hit crunch time in Biden spending fight Republican immigration proposal falls flat MORE (Ky.) introduced those articles of impeachment with Green. All but Gutiérrez, who did not vote, and Yarmuth, who voted to table the resolution, supported Green’s efforts.

Yarmuth serves as the ranking Democrat on the House Budget Committee.

Many progressives who haven’t introduced impeachment measures also voted for Green’s resolution.

Liberal Democrats like Reps. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalSenators introduce bipartisan infrastructure bill in rare Sunday session Angst grips America's most liberal city Congress must lower the Medicare Age to save the lives of older Americans MORE (Wash.), Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinHouse at war over Jan. 6 inquiry, mask mandate GOP Rep. Clyde defends 'normal tourist visit' comparison for Jan. 6 Five takeaways from a bracing day of Jan. 6 testimony MORE (Md.), Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyDemocrats repeal prohibition on funding abortions abroad Nearly 140 Democrats urge EPA to 'promptly' allow California to set its own vehicle pollution standards Omar reflects on personal experiences with hate in making case for new envoy MORE (Ill.), Raúl Grijalva (Ariz.), and Keith EllisonKeith EllisonAttorneys general looking into online fundraising practices Minnesota AG asks judge to acknowledge trauma of children who witnessed Floyd's death Sunday shows preview: Moderates, Biden reach deal on infrastructure; Chauvin sentenced to 22.5 years in prison MORE (Minn.) were among the lawmakers who voted against tabling Green’s resolution.

Ellison serves as deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee.

Congressional Black Caucus members

Green, a member of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC), was joined by many of his fellow caucus members who have expressed disgust with Trump's handling of race relations.

CBC Chairman Cedric RichmondCedric RichmondBiden walks fine line with Fox News Critical race theory becomes focus of midterms Democrats look to flip script on GOP 'defund the police' attacks MORE (D-La.) voted against tabling Green’s resolution. So did Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.), who as assistant House minority leader was the only member of Democratic leadership to vote with Green.

Green’s articles of impeachment also cited Trump’s personal attacks against fellow CBC member, Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonBiden to meet with Surfside families as rescue efforts enter eighth day Biden offers traditional address in eerie setting Congressional Black Caucus members post selfie celebrating first WH visit in four years MORE (D-Fla.). Trump called Wilson “wacky” on Twitter after she criticized his handling of a conversation with the family of Sgt. La David Johnson, who was killed during an October ambush in Niger.

Wilson was among the lawmakers who voted with Green.

Reps. Alma AdamsAlma Shealey AdamsIn honor of Mother's Day, lawmakers should pass the Momnibus Act Officials discuss proposals for fixing deep disparities in education digital divide The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - At 50 days in charge, Democrats hail American Rescue Plan as major win MORE (N.C.), Karen BassKaren Ruth BassScott: 'There is hope' for police reform bill Biden: Republicans who say Democrats want to defund the police are lying Omar leads lawmakers in calling for US envoy to combat Islamophobia MORE (Calif.), Joyce BeattyJoyce Birdson BeattyHouse ethics panel decides against probe after Hank Johnson civil disobedience Jackson Lee is third CBC member in three weeks to be arrested protesting for voting rights 'Good Trouble': Black caucus embraces civil disobedience MORE (Ohio), Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeHouse passes host of bills to strengthen cybersecurity in wake of attacks Haiti Caucus: Forging path out of crisis will not be quick, but necessary to avoid false 'democracy' US lawmakers express shock at Haitian president's assassination MORE (N.Y.), Lacy ClayWilliam (Lacy) Lacy ClayLobbying world Ex-Rep. Clay joins law and lobbying firm Pillsbury Liberal advocacy group stirs debate, discomfort with primary challenges MORE (Mo.), Danny K. Davis (Ill.), Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansGroup launches first national ad campaign to celebrate America's 250th anniversary Cornyn is most prolific tweeter in Congress so far in 2021 Six ways to visualize a divided America MORE (Pa.), Fudge, Alcee HastingsAlcee (Judge) Lamar HastingsNew Mexico Democrat Stansbury sworn into Haaland's old seat House Democrats unveil .9 billion bill to boost security after insurrection Carter sworn in as House member to replace Richmond, padding Democrats' majority MORE (Fla.), Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeePhotos of the Week: Olympic sabre semi-finals, COVID-19 vigil and a loris House ethics panel decides against probe after Hank Johnson civil disobedience Jackson Lee is third CBC member in three weeks to be arrested protesting for voting rights MORE (Texas), Robin KellyRobin Lynne KellyInitial hospital costs for gun injuries tops B per year: GAO report Lobbying world Pharmaceutical industry donated to two-thirds of Congress ahead of 2020 elections: analysis MORE (Ill.), Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceBlack caucus chair arrested at Capitol during voting rights protest Supreme Court deals blow to Black Caucus voting rights efforts Democrats introduce equal pay legislation for US national team athletes MORE (Mich.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeHouse passes sprawling spending bill ahead of fall shutdown fight House passes spending bill to boost Capitol Police and Hill staffer pay Democrats repeal prohibition on funding abortions abroad MORE (Calif.), John LewisJohn LewisManchin 'can't imagine' supporting change to filibuster for voting rights House ethics panel decides against probe after Hank Johnson civil disobedience Constitutional rights are the exception MORE (Ga.), Gwen MooreGwen Sophia MooreWisconsin GOP quietly prepares Ron Johnson backup plans Pelosi picks Democrats for special panel tackling inequality Democrats offer bill to encourage hiring of groups hard-hit by pandemic MORE (Wis.), Bobby RushBobby Lee RushHouse passes host of bills to strengthen cybersecurity in wake of attacks OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats lay out vision for Civilian Climate Corps | Manchin to back controversial public lands nominee | White House details environmental justice plan Democrats lay out vision for Civilian Climate Corps MORE (Ill.), Bennie ThompsonBennie Gordon ThompsonHouse members will huddle Friday to plot next steps on Jan. 6 probe Budowsky: Liz Cheney, a Reagan Republican, and Pelosi, Ms. Democrat, seek Jan. 6 truth The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Officers recount the horror of Jan. 6 MORE (Miss.), Waters and Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanLawmakers spend more on personal security in wake of insurrection Biden administration criticized over report that it is not extending home confinement for prisoners Group launches first national ad campaign to celebrate America's 250th anniversary MORE (N.J.) made up the remaining CBC members who voted against tabling Green’s resolution.

Not all CBC members joined in. Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesMcCarthy jokes it'll be hard not to 'hit' Pelosi with gavel if he is Speaker Jeffries: 'Sick and cynical' for GOP to blame Pelosi for Jan. 6 Democrat unveils bill to allow only House members to serve as Speaker MORE (N.Y.), who helps lead House Democrats’ messaging, voted to table the impeachment resolution.

The unexpected

Multiple Democrats who serve as the ranking member on House committees showed their support for impeaching Trump.

They included Reps. Louise SlaughterDorothy (Louise) Louise SlaughterDemocrats must go on the offensive against voter suppression House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading Sotomayor, Angela Davis formally inducted into National Women's Hall of Fame MORE (N.Y.), the top Democrat on the House Rules Committee; Frank Pallone Jr.Frank Joseph PalloneIntercept bureau chief: Democrats dropping support of Medicare for All could threaten bill's momentum House Democrats reintroduce road map to carbon neutrality by 2050 House Democrats criticize Texas's 'shortcomings in preparations' on winter storms MORE (N.J.), who leads Democrats on the House Energy and Commerce Committee; and Robert Brady (Pa.), who serves as ranking member of the House Administration Committee.

Then there was Rep. Michael CapuanoMichael (Mike) Everett CapuanoBottom line Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy MORE (D-Mass.), who as recently as this summer warned against forcing Democrats to go on the record about impeachment.

At the time, Sherman had mulled possibly forcing a vote on his article of impeachment using the same process Green did on Wednesday. Capuano spoke up during a House Democratic caucus meeting to caution about the consequences for the party’s efforts to win the majority in 2018.

But on Wednesday, Capuano said in a Facebook post that it’s “time to have an open, honest debate on President Trump and his fitness for office.”

“Practically and politically, I think most of us can agree that passing articles of impeachment in this House isn’t realistic at this moment in our history. But sometimes, it’s more important to follow your heart than do the practical or political calculation,” Capuano wrote.