Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenImpeachment will be at the top of Democrats' agenda if they take the House majority Panetta: Dems shouldn't get ahead of themselves on impeachment Pence on Dems impeaching Trump: ‘I take them at their word’ MORE (D-Texas) pledged Tuesday that the House vote he forced last week on impeaching President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump: I hope voters pay attention to Dem tactics amid Kavanaugh fight South Korea leader: North Korea agrees to take steps toward denuclearization Graham calls handling of Kavanaugh allegations 'a drive-by shooting' MORE won’t be the last.

The House overwhelmingly rejected Green's measure to consider articles of impeachment against Trump. Most Democrats joined with Republicans to table the resolution, but a total of 58 Democrats, including Green, backed impeachment.

Green did not specify when he would try to force a another vote, but vowed it was coming.

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“There will be another vote to impeach this president. There will be another vote because I will not stand by and watch this country, the country I love, be brought into shame and disrepute because of a person who is unfit to hold the office of president,” Green said in a House floor speech.

Green’s articles of impeachment state that Trump has “brought disrepute, contempt, ridicule and disgrace on the presidency” and “sown discord among the people of the United States.”

The articles cite Trump’s equivocating response to the violent clash between white supremacists and counterprotesters in Charlottesville, Va.; criticisms of NFL players kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality; disparate treatment of hurricane victims in Puerto Rico; and personal attacks against Rep. Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonTrump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin Clyburn rips Trump over Omarosa 'dog' comment: 'I don’t know of anything that has been more troubling to me' Dem lawmaker calls Trump racist in response to 'dog' comment MORE (D-Fla.), who is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus alongside Green.

“When you speak ill of persons who are exercising their constitutional right to protest, and you call their mothers dogs, when you call them SOBs, you are creating harm to society, especially when it emanates from the highest office in the land,” Green said in his floor speech.

“History will judge us all.”

House Democratic leaders do not support impeachment at this point, citing the ongoing special counsel investigation of whether the Trump campaign was involved with the Russian government’s effort to influence the 2016 presidential election.

Both House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDem lawmakers slam Trump’s declassification of Russia documents as ‘brazen abuse of power’ Russia probe accelerates political prospects for House Intel Dems Pelosi calls on Ryan to bring long-term Violence Against Women Act to floor MORE (D-Calif.) and the second-ranking House Democrat, Minority Whip Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDems' confidence swells with midterms fast approaching Trump's Puerto Rico tweets spark backlash Hoyer lays out government reform blueprint MORE (Md.), voted to table Green’s resolution last week.

While Pelosi and Hoyer acknowledged that there are “legitimate questions” about Trump’s fitness for office, they maintained that “now is not the time to consider articles of impeachment.”

The 58 Democrats who voted in favor of Green’s resolution included other lawmakers who have agitated for impeachment, like Reps. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersKavanaugh hires attorney amid sexual assault allegations: report Scalise: Democrats need to denounce political violence Women wield sizable power in ‘Me Too’ midterms MORE (Calif.) and Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanLawmakers press Trump officials on implementing Russia sanctions Swastika painted on sidewalk in Colorado town: report Top Dem lawmaker pushing committee for closed-door debrief with Trump’s interpreter MORE (Calif.).

Sherman introduced an article of impeachment in July alleging that Trump obstructed justice by firing FBI Director James Comey amid the investigation into Russia’s election meddling.

Green and five other Democrats also unveiled articles of impeachment last month that accuse Trump of obstructing justice, violating the foreign emoluments clause barring the president from taking gifts from foreign governments and undermining the judiciary and press.

The other lawmakers in support of Green’s resolution ranged from fellow Congressional Black Caucus members, progressives and a handful of senior Democratic leadership allies who haven’t been vocal about impeachment.

Four Democrats, Reps. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroCastro says Dems will restart Russia probe if they win back the House Rep. Castro: Hispanic community wants ‘infrastructure of opportunity’ to exist for all Americans The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by Better Medicare Alliance — Hurricane Florence a new test for Trump team MORE (Texas), Marc VeaseyMarc Allison VeaseyOvernight Defense: VA pick breezes through confirmation hearing | House votes to move on defense bill negotiations | Senate bill would set 'stringent' oversight on North Korea talks Bipartisan solution is hooked on facts, not fiction House Dems launch '18 anti-poverty tour MORE (Texas), Carol Shea-PorterCarol Shea-PorterElection Countdown: What to watch in final primaries | Dems launch M ad buy for Senate races | Senate seats most likely to flip | Trump slump worries GOP | Koch network's new super PAC Bernie Sanders's son falls short in New Hampshire primary Chris Pappas wins Democratic House primary in New Hampshire MORE (N.H.) and Terri SewellTerrycina (Terri) Andrea SewellDemocrats unite to expand Social Security Senate panel postpones election security bill markup over lack of GOP support Hillicon Valley: FBI fires Strzok after anti-Trump tweets | Trump signs defense bill with cyber war policy | Google under scrutiny over location data | Sinclair's troubles may just be beginning | Tech to ease health data access | Netflix CFO to step down MORE (Ala.), meanwhile, voted “present.”