Democrat forces vote over GOP lawmaker's poster on House floor
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In a sign of the frayed nerves on Capitol Hill on the first day of the government shutdown, a House Democrat forced a vote on whether a Republican’s poster adhered to the chamber’s rules.

Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneLawmakers grill Pentagon over Trump's Germany drawdown Bottom line Jerry Carl wins GOP Alabama runoff to replace Rep. Bradley Byrne MORE (R-Ala.) tried to speak on the House floor next to a red poster featuring an old quote from Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Voters say Biden should make coronavirus vaccine a priority: poll New York City subway service could be slashed 40 percent, officials warn MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2013 stating that a shutdown is the “politics of idiocy, of confrontation, of paralysis.”

But Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterRep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 Capitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (D-Colo.) interrupted, arguing that the poster is “disparaging to a member of the Senate.”

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The presiding officer, Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackOn The Money: Trump gambles with new stimulus strategy | Trump cannot block grand jury subpoena for his tax returns, court rules | Long-term jobless figures rise, underscoring economic pain Womack to replace Graves on Financial Services subcommittee Ex-CBO director calls for more than trillion in coronavirus stimulus spending MORE (R-Ark.), then inspected the poster and ruled that it abided by House rules.

Perlmutter then tried to appeal the ruling, demanding a roll call vote.

The House voted 224-173 to uphold Womack's ruling, with two Democrats voting “present.” Six Democrats voted with Republicans to support the ruling that the poster was in order.

Once the vote finished, Byrne tried to resume his speech pinning blame on Senate Democrats for the shutdown. But House Democrats kept interrupting him.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisDemocrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains Biden must look to executive action to fulfill vow to Black Americans The purposeful is political: Gen Z bowls over their doubters MORE (D-Ga.) alleged that Byrne’s remarks were out of order when he referenced House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGovernors take heat for violating their own coronavirus restrictions Spending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation MORE’s (D-Calif.) comments earlier in the week describing a House-passed spending bill as “doggy doo.”

House proceedings briefly halted for a few minutes as leaders of both parties huddled near the center of the floor.

Eventually, Lewis, a civil rights icon, relented and withdrew his objection.

“We all need to be a little more human, a little more patient, and in order to have civility among all of us, I withdraw my objection,” Lewis said.