Democrat forces vote over GOP lawmaker's poster on House floor
© CSPAN

In a sign of the frayed nerves on Capitol Hill on the first day of the government shutdown, a House Democrat forced a vote on whether a Republican’s poster adhered to the chamber’s rules.

Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneSessions vows to 'work for' Trump endorsement Trump attends football game with Jeff Sessions' Alabama Senate race opponent Bradley Byrne The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg looks to upend Democratic race MORE (R-Ala.) tried to speak on the House floor next to a red poster featuring an old quote from Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis Schumer2020 Republicans accuse Schumer of snubbing legislation Schumer: Leadership trying to work out competing surprise medical bill measures Top GOP senator: Drug pricing action unlikely before end of year MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2013 stating that a shutdown is the “politics of idiocy, of confrontation, of paralysis.”

But Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterFinancial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more House passes bill to protect cannabis industry access to banks, credit unions Showing consumers health care pricing could lower costs MORE (D-Colo.) interrupted, arguing that the poster is “disparaging to a member of the Senate.”

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The presiding officer, Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackTom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Lawmakers dismiss fresh fears of another government shutdown Lawmakers pay tribute to late Justice Stevens MORE (R-Ark.), then inspected the poster and ruled that it abided by House rules.

Perlmutter then tried to appeal the ruling, demanding a roll call vote.

The House voted 224-173 to uphold Womack's ruling, with two Democrats voting “present.” Six Democrats voted with Republicans to support the ruling that the poster was in order.

Once the vote finished, Byrne tried to resume his speech pinning blame on Senate Democrats for the shutdown. But House Democrats kept interrupting him.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisDemocrats ramp up oversight efforts over 'opportunity zone' incentive The 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Detroit police chief calls Tlaib facial recognization idea 'racist' MORE (D-Ga.) alleged that Byrne’s remarks were out of order when he referenced House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: GOP senator says drug price action unlikely this year | House panel weighs ban on flavored e-cigs | New York sues Juul Five things to know about Tuesday's impeachment hearings McConnell hopes Senate impeachment trial 'not too lengthy a process' MORE’s (D-Calif.) comments earlier in the week describing a House-passed spending bill as “doggy doo.”

House proceedings briefly halted for a few minutes as leaders of both parties huddled near the center of the floor.

Eventually, Lewis, a civil rights icon, relented and withdrew his objection.

“We all need to be a little more human, a little more patient, and in order to have civility among all of us, I withdraw my objection,” Lewis said.