Democrat forces vote over GOP lawmaker's poster on House floor
© CSPAN

In a sign of the frayed nerves on Capitol Hill on the first day of the government shutdown, a House Democrat forced a vote on whether a Republican’s poster adhered to the chamber’s rules.

Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneTrump's Slovenia Ambassador Lynda Blanchard jumps into Alabama Senate race Mo Brooks expresses interest in running for Shelby's Senate seat Ex-Rep. Mike Conaway, former aide launch lobbying firm MORE (R-Ala.) tried to speak on the House floor next to a red poster featuring an old quote from Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerPew poll: 50 percent approve of Democrats in Congress Former state Rep. Vernon Jones launches challenge to Kemp in Georgia Schumer lays groundwork for future filibuster reform MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2013 stating that a shutdown is the “politics of idiocy, of confrontation, of paralysis.”

But Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George PerlmutterDemocrats urge Biden to take executive action on assault-style firearms Colorado governor, spouse test positive for COVID-19 Rep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (D-Colo.) interrupted, arguing that the poster is “disparaging to a member of the Senate.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The presiding officer, Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackMarjorie Taylor Greene's delay tactics frustrate GOP Trust between lawmakers reaches all-time low after Capitol riots Pelosi announces lawmakers will be fined ,000 if they bypass metal detectors to House floor MORE (R-Ark.), then inspected the poster and ruled that it abided by House rules.

Perlmutter then tried to appeal the ruling, demanding a roll call vote.

The House voted 224-173 to uphold Womack's ruling, with two Democrats voting “present.” Six Democrats voted with Republicans to support the ruling that the poster was in order.

Once the vote finished, Byrne tried to resume his speech pinning blame on Senate Democrats for the shutdown. But House Democrats kept interrupting him.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisProgressives put Democrats on defense Democrats face mounting hurdles to agenda Democrats see opportunity as states push new voting rules MORE (D-Ga.) alleged that Byrne’s remarks were out of order when he referenced House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden angers Democrats by keeping Trump-era refugee cap Democratic Rep. Mondaire Jones calls on Breyer to retire Biden rebuffs Democrats, keeps refugee admissions at 15,000 MORE’s (D-Calif.) comments earlier in the week describing a House-passed spending bill as “doggy doo.”

House proceedings briefly halted for a few minutes as leaders of both parties huddled near the center of the floor.

Eventually, Lewis, a civil rights icon, relented and withdrew his objection.

“We all need to be a little more human, a little more patient, and in order to have civility among all of us, I withdraw my objection,” Lewis said.