Democrat forces vote over GOP lawmaker's poster on House floor
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In a sign of the frayed nerves on Capitol Hill on the first day of the government shutdown, a House Democrat forced a vote on whether a Republican’s poster adhered to the chamber’s rules.

Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneGOP lawmaker offers resolution to censure Pelosi for holding articles of impeachment GOP rep releases campaign ad ripping Kaepernick, 'The Squad' GOP rep rails against Democrats for rejecting Republican impeachment amendment MORE (R-Ala.) tried to speak on the House floor next to a red poster featuring an old quote from Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerVeronica Escobar to give Spanish-language response to Trump State of the Union address The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democrats turn to obstruction charge Liberal super PAC to run digital ads slamming Trump over Medicare comments MORE (D-N.Y.) in 2013 stating that a shutdown is the “politics of idiocy, of confrontation, of paralysis.”

But Rep. Ed PerlmutterEdwin (Ed) George Perlmutter2019 was a historic year for marijuana law reform — here's why Impeachment surprise: Bills Congress could actually pass in 2020 Financial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more MORE (D-Colo.) interrupted, arguing that the poster is “disparaging to a member of the Senate.”

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The presiding officer, Rep. Steve WomackStephen (Steve) Allen WomackDemocrats don't expect to do 2020 budget Tom Cotton's only Democratic rival quits race in Arkansas Lawmakers dismiss fresh fears of another government shutdown MORE (R-Ark.), then inspected the poster and ruled that it abided by House rules.

Perlmutter then tried to appeal the ruling, demanding a roll call vote.

The House voted 224-173 to uphold Womack's ruling, with two Democrats voting “present.” Six Democrats voted with Republicans to support the ruling that the poster was in order.

Once the vote finished, Byrne tried to resume his speech pinning blame on Senate Democrats for the shutdown. But House Democrats kept interrupting him.

Rep. John LewisJohn LewisObama marks MLK Day by honoring King for his 'poetic brilliance' and 'moral clarity' The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial John Lewis to miss Martin Luther King Jr. Day event MORE (D-Ga.) alleged that Byrne’s remarks were out of order when he referenced House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCNN's Axelrod says impeachment didn't come up until 80 minutes into focus group On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Social Security emerges as flash point in Biden-Sanders fight | Dems urge Supreme Court to save consumer agency | Trump to sign USMCA next week Veronica Escobar to give Spanish-language response to Trump State of the Union address MORE’s (D-Calif.) comments earlier in the week describing a House-passed spending bill as “doggy doo.”

House proceedings briefly halted for a few minutes as leaders of both parties huddled near the center of the floor.

Eventually, Lewis, a civil rights icon, relented and withdrew his objection.

“We all need to be a little more human, a little more patient, and in order to have civility among all of us, I withdraw my objection,” Lewis said.