Rep. Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenIndividuals with significant disabilities need hope and action Exiting lawmakers jockey for K Street perch GOP trading fancy offices, nice views for life in minority MORE (R-N.J.), the chairman of the powerful House Appropriations Committee who defied his party to vote against President TrumpDonald John TrumpVeterans groups demand end to shutdown: 'Get your act together' Brown launches tour in four early nominating states amid 2020 consideration Pence on border wall: Trump won't be ‘deterred’ by Dem ‘obstruction’ MORE's tax cuts, announced Monday that he will not seek reelection.

Frelinghuysen, 71, was a top Democratic target given the tilt of his district, which Trump won over Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonGillibrand announces exploratory committee to run for president on Colbert Former PepsiCo CEO being considered for World Bank chief post: report Live coverage: Trump AG pick grilled on Mueller probe at confirmation hearing MORE in 2016 by just a percentage point.

Trump's low approval ratings only raised Democratic hopes that they could defeat Frelinghuysen if he sought a 13th term — especially after passage of a tax-cut bill that puts a $10,000 ceiling on the exemption for local and state taxes and property taxes, which was expected to hit the Republican's district hard.

Frelinghuysen had touted his bipartisan credentials, but his decision to retire suggests he faced a difficult path at best to win reelection.

“I have worked in a bipartisan manner, not just in times of crisis but always, because I believe it best serves my constituents, my state and our country," Frelinghuysen said in a statement.

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"I have sincerely endeavored to earn that trust every day and I thank my constituents and my home state of New Jersey for the honor to serve and I will continue to do so to the best of my abilities through the end of my term," he said.

He follows endangered GOP lawmakers such as Reps. Darrell IssaDarrell Edward IssaSenate throws hundreds of Trump nominees into limbo Congress must take the next steps on federal criminal justice reforms Lynch testimony marks final interview of GOP-led probe MORE (Calif.) and Ed RoyceEdward (Ed) Randall RoyceBottom Line Exiting lawmakers jockey for K Street perch House passes resolution calling for release of Reuters journalists jailed in Myanmar MORE (Calif.) in deciding to retire. Frelinghuysen is only in his first term as House Appropriations Committee chairman, a top post that lawmakers traditionally serve in for years.

Democrats need a net gain of 24 seats in this fall's midterms to win back control of the House. 

Frelinghuysen has found himself at odds with the House GOP conference repeatedly over the past year.

After initially opposing a GOP ObamaCare repeal-and-replace bill, Frelinghuysen voted for his party's ObamaCare legislation in May — and then came under criticism from activists in his district.

He was one of 12 House Republicans to vote against the GOP’s tax overhaul in December, and warned at the time that it would lead to tax increases for his constituents and “damage our state’s housing market and business environment.”

House GOP leaders considered removing Frelinghuysen as chairman of the Appropriations Committee in retaliation for bucking the party line on one of their biggest legislative priorities.

Frelinghuysen’s vote rubbed his colleagues the wrong way because committee chairmen are generally expected to support the leadership.

Rep. Mark WalkerBradley (Mark) Mark WalkerCorker: Breakthrough reached in shutdown stalemate Senate in last-minute talks to find deal to avert shutdown  GOP takes victory lap around Pelosi after passing border wall bill MORE (R-N.C.), chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee, told The Hill at the time that he had “real problems” with Frelinghuysen voting against the tax bill.

“This is a committee chairman who’s going to be pitching some kind of spending thing, and if you can’t get on board and support one of the promises we’ve made to the American people, I have real problems with that,” Walker said.

Frelinghuysen is now the ninth House committee chairman to opt against seeking reelection this year. But unlike most of the other committee chairmen who are retiring, Frelinghuysen would not have had to relinquish his gavel next year due to the GOP’s term-limit rules that only allow committee chairmen to serve for three consecutive terms.

His retirement could make it easier for Democrats to take advantage of an open seat this election cycle instead of attempting to topple a 12-term incumbent.

National Democrats are rallying around Mikie Sherrill, who had already launched a campaign against Frelinghuysen.

“Rep. Frelinghuysen’s retirement opens up a very competitive seat that is moving quickly toward Democrats. With veteran and former federal prosecutor Mikie Sherrill’s strong candidacy, and the abysmal approval ratings of Speaker [Paul] Ryan’s [R-Wis.] Republican Congress, Democrats are confident that this seat will turn blue [in] November,” Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee spokesman Evan Lukaske said.

Republicans, however, expressed confidence that they could keep a longtime GOP seat in their column.

"This district has been held by a Republican since the 1980s, and we plan to keep it that way in November,” National Republican Congressional Committee Chairman Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversHouse vote fails to quell storm surrounding Steve King House passes resolution condemning white nationalism House Democrats offer measures to censure Steve King MORE (R-Ohio) said in a statement.

Frelinghuysen’s district had already been rated a “toss up” by the Cook Political Report, a nonpartisan election prognosticator.

His retirement is yet another boon for Democrats, who are seeking to take advantage of a growing number of open seats in districts already considered competitive.

Six House Republicans representing districts won by Clinton in 2016 won’t be seeking reelection, more than half of whom announced their plans within the last few weeks. They include Royce, Issa and Reps. Ileana Ros-LehtinenIleana Carmen Ros-LehtinenYoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm Black Caucus sees power grow with new Democratic majority MORE (Fla.), Dave ReichertDavid (Dave) George ReichertYoder, Messer land on K Street Ex-GOP lawmaker from Washington joins lobbying firm Outgoing GOP rep says law enforcement, not Congress should conduct investigations MORE (Wash.) and Patrick Meehan (Pa.).

Rep. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyOvernight Defense: Trump faces blowback over report he discussed leaving NATO | Pentagon extends mission on border | Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions Senate advances measure bucking Trump on Russia sanctions 116th Congress breaks records for women, minority lawmakers MORE (R-Ariz.), meanwhile, is running for the Senate instead of seeking reelection in her competitive Clinton-carried district.

Other open swing seats eyed by Democrats include those currently held by retiring Republican Reps. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoLive coverage: House elects new Speaker as Dems take charge The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — George H.W. Bush lies in state | NRCC suffers major hack | Crunch-time for Congress The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by T-Mobile — Washington poised to avert shutdown crisis, for now MORE (N.J.), Charlie DentCharles (Charlie) Wieder DentEx-GOP lawmaker says his party is having a 'Monty Python' moment on shutdown Former GOP lawmaker: Republicans know shutdown is ‘a fight they cannot win’ Pennsylvania New Members 2019 MORE (Pa.) and Dave TrottDavid Alan TrottMeet the lawmakers putting politics aside to save our climate Michigan New Members 2019 Democrats flip Michigan seat in race between two political newcomers MORE (Mich.).

In another sign of a potentially difficult year for the party, House Republicans will have to deal with far more open seats this election cycle than Democrats.

House Republicans will have to defend at least 35 open seats this year due to retirements, resignations and lawmakers running for another office. Democrats, meanwhile, have less than half as many open seats as they seek to expand their electoral map. 

Updated at 3:20 p.m.